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Tuesday, February 25, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: Group suggests ‘educational treats’ as alternative to amoral movies

“We think that the pictures now being shown are ruining the morals of our children,” said a spokesperson for the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. (Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)
“We think that the pictures now being shown are ruining the morals of our children,” said a spokesperson for the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. (Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)

The Women’s Christian Temperance Union offered an alternative to the Sunday movie matinee.

They suggested “educational treats,” meaning musical concerts and “biblical and educational films,” the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported.

“We think that the pictures now being shown are ruining the morals of our children,” a spokeswoman said.

The Spokane Ministerial Association was attempting to ban Sunday plays and movies – so far without success.

From the movie beat: The Playter Film Co. renewed its lease at studios at Minnehaha Park after the park board reduced its rent, the Chronicle said.

Moviemaker Wellington Playter asked for concessions to keep the movie industry viable in the city. One park board member said the concession will “give these people a chance to put Spokane on the moving pictures map.”

Playter claimed he would commence production of 25 one-reel comedies of rural life. He said one comedy would be released every week. He also claimed he was “starting a national advertising campaign to bring moving picture productions to Spokane.”

The local motion picture industry had been on life support since the Washington Motion Picture Corp., which had built the studios at Minnehaha, went bankrupt after making only one movie.

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