Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Cloudy 33° Cloudy
News >  World

Ancient site linked to Caesar’s murder to open to public

UPDATED: Wed., Feb. 20, 2019

A view of the archeological site of Largo Argentina, in Rome, Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. A complex of ancient temples linked to Julius Caesars murder will be opened to the public. The below-street-level temple ruins at Largo Argentina in the heart of downtown Rome is visible to pedestrians. But Romes mayor said Monday by late 2021, walkways will be constructed inside the site so that tourists can stroll through the ruins. Bulgari luxury goods maker is sponsoring the work. The area includes a stone podium that was part of the senate-meeting place where Caesar was slain in 44 B.C. (Gregorio Borgia / AP)
A view of the archeological site of Largo Argentina, in Rome, Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. A complex of ancient temples linked to Julius Caesars murder will be opened to the public. The below-street-level temple ruins at Largo Argentina in the heart of downtown Rome is visible to pedestrians. But Romes mayor said Monday by late 2021, walkways will be constructed inside the site so that tourists can stroll through the ruins. Bulgari luxury goods maker is sponsoring the work. The area includes a stone podium that was part of the senate-meeting place where Caesar was slain in 44 B.C. (Gregorio Borgia / AP)
Associated Press

ROME – A complex of ancient temples in Rome that are linked to the scene of Julius Caesar’s murder will be opened to the public.

The below-street-level temple ruins at Largo Argentina in downtown Rome is visible to pedestrians peering from above but closed to visitors. For decades, access was enjoyed only by a colony of cats, the cadre of volunteers fed them and, occasionally, archaeologists.

But Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi announced Monday that by late 2021, walkways will be built inside the site so tourists can stroll through the ruins. Luxury Bulgari jewelry-maker, which also funded the restoration of Rome’s Spanish Steps, is sponsoring the work.

The ruins include a stone pedestal from the Curia of Pompey, the meeting place of senators, where Caesar was slain in 44 B.C.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.


Annual health and dental insurance enrollment period open now

 (Courtesy Washington Healthplanfinder)
Sponsored

2020 has been a stressful year for myriad reasons.