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Thursday, October 17, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Idaho

Bill to keep Idaho wolf control board headed to governor

UPDATED: Wed., Feb. 20, 2019, 12:19 p.m.

COURTESY






Justin Webb poses with one of 18 wolves he's trapped in North Idaho in seven years. Webb is the executive director of the Foundation for Wildlife Management, which pays cash rewards to trappers to kill wolves. Legislation to keep operating an Idaho board that pays a federal agency to kill wolves that attack livestock and elk is on its way to Gov. Brad Little. (COURTESY)
COURTESY Justin Webb poses with one of 18 wolves he's trapped in North Idaho in seven years. Webb is the executive director of the Foundation for Wildlife Management, which pays cash rewards to trappers to kill wolves. Legislation to keep operating an Idaho board that pays a federal agency to kill wolves that attack livestock and elk is on its way to Gov. Brad Little. (COURTESY)
By Keith Ridler Associated Press

BOISE, Idaho – Legislation to keep operating an Idaho board that pays a federal agency to kill wolves that attack livestock and elk is on its way to Gov. Brad Little.

The House on Monday voted 51-19 to approve the bill to repeal a section of Idaho law that would end the five-year-run of the Idaho Wolf Depredation Control Board.

The legislation requested by the board has already passed the Senate.

Backers say Idaho has too many wolves that are harming ranching and farming families by killing livestock. Those who opposed the bill suggested it include non-lethal methods of wolf control.

The board has in the past received $400,000 annually from the state. Gov. Brad Little has asked the Legislature to approve $200,000 in general fund tax dollars for the board in fiscal year 2020.

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