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Thursday, August 22, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: With a foot of snow on the ground, officials ask public for help to get flu nurses to new patients

Officials asked the public to help the influenza nurses by lending them use of autos becuase Spokane was buried under almost a foot of fresh snow and new flu cases were increasing, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Feb. 26, 1919. This newspaper also reported that “joyriding” – essentially car theft – would become a felony under a bill approved by the Washington House. (Spokesman-Review archives)
Officials asked the public to help the influenza nurses by lending them use of autos becuase Spokane was buried under almost a foot of fresh snow and new flu cases were increasing, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Feb. 26, 1919. This newspaper also reported that “joyriding” – essentially car theft – would become a felony under a bill approved by the Washington House. (Spokesman-Review archives)

Spokane’s three influenza nurses “spent the larger part of the day tramping through deep snow to make their calls.”

An uptick in new flu cases had residents worried that the Spanish flu epidemic had not run its course. City health officer Dr. J.B. Anderson downplayed some of those fears by noting that many doctors were now listing all severe bronchial-respiratory illnesses as the flu, due to an excess of caution.

However, he was under no illusions that the epidemic was over. There were more new cases reported over the previous two days than at any time since the height of the epidemic in December.

Officials asked the public to help the influenza nurses by lending them the use of autos. Spokane was buried under almost a foot of fresh snow.

From the Wobbly beat: Two Spokane members of the Industrial Workers of the World (Wobblies) were arrested in Butte and “will be tried for deportation as undesirable aliens.”

Joseph Kennedy and John Jackson were accused of inciting a general strike in Butte. It was unclear to which country they might be deported.

Both men already were wanted in Spokane after being indicted by a grand jury for “conspiracy to obstruct the war by strike.” But that indictment would be dropped if they were convicted on the Butte charges.

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