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Wednesday, October 21, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Measles outbreak near Portland, Oregon, sickens 35

This Feb. 6, 2015 photo shows a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine on a countertop at a pediatrics clinic in Greenbrae, Calif. A measles outbreak near Portland has sickened dozens of people in Oregon and Washington, with several more cases suspected, and public health officials scrambling to contain the virus say low vaccination rates are making the situation worse. Clark County Public Health said Sunday, Jan. 28, 2019, that the majority of the cases involve children younger than 10. (Eric Risberg / AP)
This Feb. 6, 2015 photo shows a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine on a countertop at a pediatrics clinic in Greenbrae, Calif. A measles outbreak near Portland has sickened dozens of people in Oregon and Washington, with several more cases suspected, and public health officials scrambling to contain the virus say low vaccination rates are making the situation worse. Clark County Public Health said Sunday, Jan. 28, 2019, that the majority of the cases involve children younger than 10. (Eric Risberg / AP)
By Gillian Flaccus Associated Press

VANCOUVER, Wash. – A measles outbreak near Portland has sickened 35 people in Oregon and Washington, with 11 more cases suspected.

Thirty-one patients had not been vaccinated against measles, and the status of four others who were infected is not known. One child has been hospitalized.

Public health officials struggling to contain the highly contagious virus say the outbreak is a textbook example of why it’s critical to vaccinate against childhood diseases.

Measles was eradicated in the U.S. after a safe and cheap vaccine was developed in 1963, but in recent years, outbreaks from New York to California have sickened hundreds.

The vaccination rate in the area is 78 percent, lower than average, and that’s making it harder to contain the outbreak.

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