Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Night 15° Clear
News >  Spokane

Social media threats do not disrupt return to classes at LC

Jan. 29, 2019 Updated Tue., Jan. 29, 2019 at 7:30 p.m.

A pair of Spokane Public School resource officers and a Spokane police officer, right, keep an eye on Lewis and Clark High School students as they arrive for class, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, in downtown Spokane. A social media threat was made against the school and students prompting extra security. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)
A pair of Spokane Public School resource officers and a Spokane police officer, right, keep an eye on Lewis and Clark High School students as they arrive for class, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019, in downtown Spokane. A social media threat was made against the school and students prompting extra security. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

Life goes on at Lewis and Clark High School, where the students appear to be taking the latest round of social media threats in stride.

Attendance on Tuesday – the opening day of the second semester – was close to normal, with 222 reported absences, or about 10 percent. Typical absences run at about 8 percent.

“It was the first day of second semester and it followed a four-day break for most students,” principal Marybeth Smith said Tuesday. “As a result, they were pretty eager to return to school to see classmates and get back into the rhythm of school.”

Students returned to a heightened law enforcement presence as Spokane police, working with the FBI, investigate a series of threats made last weekend against the school and two individual students.

Brian Coddington, director of community relations for Spokane Public Schools, said there were no new developments in the investigation.

The incident is the third at LC in less than a year. In May, the school was half full after a shooting threat was posted on social media.

In November, police investigated a threat posted against the school on Instagram.

“Our families continue to be so wonderful and so strong-minded,” Smith said.

“They are, like all of us, frustrated and angry that their children are having to navigate these same very upsetting waters yet again, but they are also resolved to make sure their students are not missing out on opportunities to learn and to connect with staff and classmates they care about,” Smith said.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Active Person

Subscribe now to get breaking news alerts in your email inbox

Get breaking news delivered to your inbox as it happens.