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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: Giant Independence Day parade had an international flavor

Spokane’s giant Victory and Independence Day parade through downtown had an international flavor, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on July 4, 1919. (Spokesman-Review archives)
Spokane’s giant Victory and Independence Day parade through downtown had an international flavor, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on July 4, 1919. (Spokesman-Review archives)

Spokane’s giant Victory and Independence Day parade through downtown had an international flavor.

Interspersed with the returned American soldiers were soldiers from Canada, England, Italy and Greece. All of these countries had been U.S. allies during the war.

The parade also included Civil War veterans “whose representation from year to year is slowly thinning before the assaults of time,” according to the Spokane Daily Chronicle.

From the Wobbly beat: In a counterpoint to Spokane’s giant Fourth of July celebration, the Industrial Workers of the World – commonly known as Wobblies – held its own smaller celebration at Turner Hall in Spokane.

A crowd of 600 people gave its biggest cheer to 12 little girls who sang a song with the following repeated refrain: “All hail to the Bolsheviki!”

The Wobblies also staged a parade on Trent and Main avenues, featuring “1,500 workingmen” marching four abreast. There was a heavy police presence, but the Chronicle reported that “peace and order reigned” – at least up until the Chronicle’s afternoon deadline.

From the boating beat: The Coeur d’Alene Regatta attracted crowds from all over the region, and the Chronicle reported that 10,000 people had gathered before noon.

The event included a variety of boat races and swimming competitions.

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