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Friday, November 15, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Home and garden

In the Garden: Spokane in Bloom kicks of garden tour season

Jim Jackson and Nancy Caputo pose in one of the many areas of their garden at 1122 E. 20th Avenue in Spokane, Wash on May 29, 2019. Their property features one acre of intricate landscaping with many fountains, peaceful nooks for sitting, and a wide variety of flowers and vegetation. (Libby Kamrowski / The Spokesman-Review)
Jim Jackson and Nancy Caputo pose in one of the many areas of their garden at 1122 E. 20th Avenue in Spokane, Wash on May 29, 2019. Their property features one acre of intricate landscaping with many fountains, peaceful nooks for sitting, and a wide variety of flowers and vegetation. (Libby Kamrowski / The Spokesman-Review)

The garden tour season officially starts on June 15 with Spokane in Bloom. This year’s tour features nine south-side gardens, carefully selected by the Inland Empire Gardeners of Spokane.

The peaceful garden of Nancy Caputo and Jim Jackson, located at 1122 E. 20th Ave., is the result of a joyful collaboration between the homeowners and a team of landscape professionals.

After moving into the home in September 2015, Caputo and Jackson sensed that the existing landscape needed some special attention.

“It was more or less just a long sloped lot,” Jackson related. “When a huge tree came down during the windstorm of 2017, we realized that as long as the heavy equipment that would remove it would destroy the lawn anyway, we might as well take advantage of that as an opportunity to make some big changes.”

They initially planned on adding three terraces but, before they knew it, ended up with a total of nine – each with a very different character.

“My initial goal was to have several peaceful, tranquil retreats where you could read a book or meditate,” Caputo explained.

Added Jackson, “That was our plan, but the way it happened was kind of like pulling up a chair and asking the yard what it wanted. We now have a lot of nooks and crannies to enjoy.”

What visitors will find are pleasing sitting areas punctuated with the soothing sound of splashing water, soaring firs in an area Caputo and Jackson refer to as “the cathedral,” attractive container plantings, shade gardens, a memorial garden to remember family members and friends who have passed, and many the different terraces that capture beautiful vistas.

“I hope people will take a little time to let the land wash over them,” Caputo said. “This is a very sacred spot.”

The following gardens are also on the tour:

Sue and Greg Plummer, 21 W. 33rd Ave. – Easy garden maintenance and colorful, pollinator-attracting flowers are the order of the day at this lovely garden. Guests will enjoy the roses, hardy perennials, native plants and container-grown vegetables.

Lori and Brian Scott, 6310 S. Pittsburg St. – The Scotts have created a garden filled with plants that remind them of their travel adventures and the family members who have shared many plants over the years. The design includes private outdoor living spaces that bring a sense of calm.

Jane and Harold Stormfeltz, 8225 S. Regal Road – This 8-acre property incorporates the elements of an English country garden, where ornamental and edible plants grow together in a charming combination.

Mary and Larry Weathers, 6921 E. Jamieson Road – Visitors will find a colorful garden featuring deer-resistant perennials, trees and shrubs punctuated by fun metal art pieces and pottery created by Larry Weathers.

Ann Ostendorf and Richard Lambert, 223 W. 21st Ave. – Discover how beautiful low-maintenance and water-wise landscaping can be. Designer/landscaper Richard Lambert chose attractive, resilient plants and allows them to grow naturally. Other points of interest include trellises, benches, a pergola and sculptures.

Sara and Russ Weaver-Lundberg, 1329 E. Overbluff Road – There is much to explore here, including formal garden areas, a fairy garden and a secret garden filled with whimsical surprises.

Lisa and John Stone, 712 E. 19th Ave. – With a lovely 1910 home as the backdrop, the garden provides interest year-round. The main goals of the flower beds are to attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

Jane and Sam Joseph, 1910 S. Upper Terrace Road – Following a landscape redesign in 2010, the Josephs’ garden has come into its own with low-maintenance heucheras and hostas, both prized for their attractive foliage. Look for the formality and structure of yews and boxwoods as well as colorful hydrangeas.

There will be a bonus stop at Snapdragon Flower Farm, 6130 E. Jamieson Road. This small farm produces flowers through ecologically sound practices. Lunch is available for purchase at the Stormfeltz garden. Tour-goers will find garden-related vendors and musicians at most of the gardens.

Susan Mulvihill is co-author, with Pat Munts, of “Northwest Gardener’s Handbook.” Contact her at Susan@susansinthegarden.com. Watch this week’s “Everyone Can Grow A Garden” video at youtube.com/c/susansinthegarden.

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