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Thursday, October 29, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: Prohibition opponents work to repeal of state booze ban; Deer Park mayor caught speeding

UPDATED: Mon., June 10, 2019

It was a big weekend for speeding tickets, with 18 speeders hauled in to traffic court, including Deer Park Mayor J.L. Olson, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported. The newspaper also reported that prices were going up for an important service: shoe shines. (Spokesman-Review archives)
It was a big weekend for speeding tickets, with 18 speeders hauled in to traffic court, including Deer Park Mayor J.L. Olson, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported. The newspaper also reported that prices were going up for an important service: shoe shines. (Spokesman-Review archives)

Spokane’s “wets” – those opposed to prohibition – did their part when it came to signing petitions, but the Seattle wets let down the East Side.

About 22,000 signatures were struck from the Seattle petitions because the signers were not registered voters or had failed to vote in the last civic election. The statewide wets were attempting to get a new liquor referendum on the statewide ballot, in hopes of repealing the state’s prohibition laws.

“Spokane has gone way over its quota, but Seattle has apparently fallen down,” said the local leader of the wets. “… They are making a desperate effort in Seattle to get the signers registered and it is possible that they will come through with nearly what they promised. Spokane County and other Eastern Washington counties have shown much enthusiasm for the measure.”

This effort was doomed to fail.

From the traffic beat: It was a big weekend for speeding tickets, with 18 speeders hauled in to traffic court.

Among the miscreants: J.L. Olson, the mayor of Deer Park.

Also, Miss T.J. Cardwell, of Harrington, was charged with racing her Buick against a Ford driven by D.A. Walsh.

From the inflation beat: Prices were going up for an important service: shoeshines.

Most of the leading shoeshine parlors in Spokane agreed to boost prices to 15 cents for shines given on Saturdays, Sundays or holidays. The old price was 10 cents.

They also agreed to standard operating hours of 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekdays, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturdays, and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sundays.

If any of the parlors violated this agreement, they would have to give a $100 gift to a charity, preferably the new Hutton children’s home (Hutton Settlement).

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