Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Day 35° Clear
News >  Spokane

100 Years Ago Today: Spokane likely on route of transcontinental flight

Spokane was anxious about its chances to be on the route of an exciting transcontinental airplane expedition, featuring four army airplanes of the Curtiss JN-4 type. They were scheduled to take off from Mineola, N.Y., and to map out an air route from the Atlantic to the Pacific. An “observation balloon” would accompany the planes. (S-R archives)
Spokane was anxious about its chances to be on the route of an exciting transcontinental airplane expedition, featuring four army airplanes of the Curtiss JN-4 type. They were scheduled to take off from Mineola, N.Y., and to map out an air route from the Atlantic to the Pacific. An “observation balloon” would accompany the planes. (S-R archives)

Spokane was on the route of an exciting transcontinental airplane expedition, featuring four army airplanes of the Curtiss JN-4 type.

They were scheduled to take off from Mineola, New York, and to map out an air route from the Atlantic to the Pacific. An “observation balloon” would accompany the planes.

Actually, the Spokane Daily Chronicle admitted that the Spokane stop was not exactly a sure thing.

The route had only been confirmed as far west at Bismarck, North Dakota, and “from Bismarck to Seattle, the places to be visited are not named, but there is little doubt but that the northern air route, passing through Spokane, will be followed.”

Spokane was anxious to be on the route, because it would bolster Spokane’s hopes for “alignment in the accepted government transcontinental air highway” in the future.

The Chamber of Commerce immediately dispatched a formal letter to the War Department inviting the planes to stop.

From the sports beat: The Spokane Country Club was hosting the region’s most prestigious golf tournament, the Open Championship of the Pacific Northwest Golf Association.

A total of 74 professionals and amateurs were vying for the cup. The Chronicle ran a front page photo of H.A. “Dixie” Fleager, stylish in plus-fours, the top contender on the amateur side. Fleager, from Seattle, was the defending amateur champ. He was also a former Northwestern University football star.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.


Annual health and dental insurance enrollment period open now

 (Courtesy Washington Healthplanfinder)
Sponsored

2020 has been a stressful year for myriad reasons.