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Monday, July 13, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: Billy Sunday, famous evangelist, to lead rally at armory for Victory bonds

Billy Sunday, the nation’s most prominent evangelist was in town,to drum up support for Victory bonds to pay for the United States’ involvement in World War I, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on May 1, 2019. Meanwhile, the city’s bakeries were scheduled to go on strike at noon that day. (Spokesman-Review archives)
Billy Sunday, the nation’s most prominent evangelist was in town,to drum up support for Victory bonds to pay for the United States’ involvement in World War I, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on May 1, 2019. Meanwhile, the city’s bakeries were scheduled to go on strike at noon that day. (Spokesman-Review archives)

Billy Sunday, the nation’s most prominent evangelist was in town, not for his usual religious revival, but to rally support for Victory Bonds to pay for the United States’ involvement in World War I.

“The incentive’s gone now, the war’s over and it’s hard to drum up enthusiasm,” Sunday said before an event scheduled for the city’s armory. “We Americans are a whimsical bunch. Germany laid out some job for us and we showed her how long it required to clean house. Now that the house is cleaned we are a bit forgetful that we haven’t paid for the cleaning.”

From the union beat: Labor strife continued in the city as bakers were to go on strike starting at noon.

They were demanding a pay increase of $4 a week, as well as closing on Sunday.

One of the city’s bakeries, the Jessmer bakery, said its operations would continue.

“We will start operating this afternoon with non-union men and hereafter will be the open shop,” said bakery Manager Van Hersett.

Milkmen and teamsters also were threatening to walk out.

From the health beat: A group of ministers raised objections to the appointment of the city’s new health officer, Major Ralph Hendricks.

The Rev. C.R. Howard, chairman of the civic righteousness committee of the ministerial union, said the group would oppose Hendrick’s appointment by city commissioners. Howard declined to say why the group opposed Hendricks’ appointment, calling the matter “delicate.”

Hendricks was a doctor who recently returned from service in France treating wounded and sick soldiers fighting in World War I.

Jim Kershner is on sabbatical.

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