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Monday, November 18, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: Teamsters, chauffeurs call end to strike

The strike of 500 Spokane teamsters and chauffeurs is off. An agreement to end the week-old strike means the men will return to work the next day, reported The Spokane Daily Chronicle on May 12, 1919. (The Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)
The strike of 500 Spokane teamsters and chauffeurs is off. An agreement to end the week-old strike means the men will return to work the next day, reported The Spokane Daily Chronicle on May 12, 1919. (The Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)
From staff reports

The strike of 500 Spokane teamsters and chauffeurs is off. An agreement to end the week-old strike means the men will return to work the next day. Approximately 600 members gathered at Foresters hall and voted. Only six votes were cast against.

Included in the new agreement are an “open shop,” official recognition of the union, an eight-hour work day, time and a half for overtime and the reinstatement of all strikers to their former positions.

The settlement was the result of two five hour bargaining sessions.

Mike Casey, international vice president of the union from San Francisco, said, “I want to thank the people of Spokane and particularly the members of the Employers Association for their broad-minded stand on the question of organized labor and their fairness in dealing with is representatives. The spirit shown on both sides is one of cooperation that forecasts future industrial peace in this city.”

“Doc” Devereaux, president of the union, said: “The boys will all be back at work tomorrow morning with the feeling of the greatest respect for the employers for the fair treatment.”

From the education beat: Principal Henry Hart and Spokane Schools Superintendent O.C. Pratt announced that 33 boys who went to Pullman the previous Friday for a track meet were not allowed to return to class until their parents came to a meeting with school officials. They did not have Hart’s permission to go and some did not register when they got to Pullman.

Pratt said “Action was taken against these boys because they violated specific rules laid down for attendance at the track meet.” Twenty of the boys had failing grades and were specifically forbidden to go and went anyway.

Fifteen of the boys, who were seniors, went to North Central and tried to register for classes there, fearing they would not graduate on time. Principal Benefiel at NC turned them away. “I’m sorry boys, but I haven’t anything to offer you but sympathy.”

From the obituaries: Mrs. W.B. McCreary Jr., the youngest daughter of State Senator R.A. Hutchinson, died after she fell from an orange tree while picnicking in Los Angeles, California. She was 23. Her wedding in 1915 was “one of the society events of the year,” according to the Spokane Chronicle.

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