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Sunday, December 15, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Patsy Clark mansion for sale – to the right buyer

UPDATED: Mon., Nov. 25, 2019

The Patsy Clark Mansion, shown here in 2017, has been put up for sale by firm of Eymann Allison Hunter Jonesm, P.S. The home designed in 1889 by architect Kirtland Cutter has been listed for $2.1 million after the firm purchased it in 2003 and underwent extensive renovations including a new roof. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
The Patsy Clark Mansion, shown here in 2017, has been put up for sale by firm of Eymann Allison Hunter Jonesm, P.S. The home designed in 1889 by architect Kirtland Cutter has been listed for $2.1 million after the firm purchased it in 2003 and underwent extensive renovations including a new roof. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

The lawyers who use the Patsy Clark Mansion for their legal office recently put an asking price on the iconic Spokane building, but they want to be sure to find the correct buyer.

John Allison, a partner in Eymann Allison Hunter Jones, P.S., said the firm, which purchased the iconic Spokane residence in 2003, first put the refurbished home up for sale in July. But only last week did John L. Scott Realty list a price for the mansion at $2.1 million.

“We’ve gotten some interest” this week, Allison said. “We figured it might take a while to find the right person.”

The mansion, at 2208 W. 2nd Ave., was created by renowned 19th century architect Kirtland Cutter, who also designed the Glover Mansion, Spokane Club and Monroe Street Bridge. Cutter’s work also includes Seattle’s Rainier Club, the Cutter Theatre in Metaline Falls and the Idaho Building for the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair.

Cutter was commissioned to draw up the the 3 1/2-story, 11,422-square-foot mansion for mining magnate Patrick “Patsy” Clark in 1889. It has has nine bedrooms, five bathrooms and a large food prep area.

Cutter designed the residence to be the “most luxurious mansion ever” after a directive from the owner, according to Spokane’s Historic Preservation Department. Cutter collected materials and furnishings for the house from around the world.

Patsy Clark died in 1915 and his wife stayed in the mansion until 1926. The house was sold to Eugene Enloe, whose family lived there until 1946.

Several owners after that operated the building as a rooming house, inn or restaurant. It was called the Francis Lester Inn in the 1950s and 1960s.

Gerry Larson, a contractor, bought the house in 1969 and came close to demolishing it. Instead, he restored it and stayed for several years. A trio of partners purchased the home in 1977 and converted it into a restaurant, Patsy Clark’s, which opened in 1982 and operated for 20 years.

Allison said the firm paid $1.03 million for the mansion in February 2003 and spent about a year refurbishing the woodwork and fixing damage from its time as a restaurant. The firm also paid to put a new roof on the structure.

The building is on the National Register of Historic Places and the lawyers brought in consultants to ensure historical accuracy in everything from paint color to lighting fixtures.

“We just don’t want to sell to anybody,” Allison said. “We are looking for the next stewards.”

Near the mansion is a duplex that was also purchased by the firm in 2003. Allison does not believe it was built at the same time as the mansion. It is being sold separately from the mansion and is listed at $450,000, he said.

But the mansion is the building that is part of the fabric of Spokane’s history.

“We are not folding the practice,” Allison said. “It’s an extremely unique building. We want to sell it when we want to, and not when we have to.”

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