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Tuesday, October 22, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Sports >  Outdoors

Search unsuccessful for injured grizzly involved in fourth mauling

FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2013, file photo, a grizzly bear cub searches for fallen fruit beneath an apple tree a few miles from the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Gardiner, Mont. A judge will decide whether the Lower 48 states' first grizzly bear hunting season in more than four decades will open as scheduled the weekend of Aug. 31, 2018. (Alan Rogers/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP, file) ORG XMIT: WYCAS301 (Alan Rogers / AP)
FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2013, file photo, a grizzly bear cub searches for fallen fruit beneath an apple tree a few miles from the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Gardiner, Mont. A judge will decide whether the Lower 48 states' first grizzly bear hunting season in more than four decades will open as scheduled the weekend of Aug. 31, 2018. (Alan Rogers/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP, file) ORG XMIT: WYCAS301 (Alan Rogers / AP)
By Brett French The Billings Gazette

A grizzly bear that attacked an Ohio archery hunter on Tuesday was apparently injured when the man fired several rounds from a handgun, according to a Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks press release.

An extensive ground search for the wounded bear in the Gravelly Mountains was unsuccessful due to dense vegetation, downfall and the lack of a blood trail, according to Morgan Jacobsen, FWP’s Region 3 Information and Education Program manager.

“The wardens found some very small blood drops and a relatively small blood trail,” he said. “They are not continuing the search for that bear.”

Although the area won’t be closed to the public, the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest has posted signs warning visitors of bear activity in the Coal Creek-Twin Springs area.

The hunter reportedly surprised the grizzly while hiking through an area of blown-down trees. The bear injured one of the hunter’s legs but retreated after the man fired several shots at the bear’s head and chest. Morgan did not know the caliber of the handgun.

Fellow hunters in the Ohio man’s party came to his aid and helped him from the forest. He was transported to the Sheridan clinic where his wounds were treated and the patient was released.

Last week the forest issued a closure along Cottonwood Road, about 8 miles north of Tuesday’s incident, as FWP wardens investigated two separate maulings that happened on Sept. 16. That closure was lifted Friday.

In those attacks three out-of-state archery hunters were injured, one of which also fired shots at the bear.

According to an interview with KIRO 7 television, the two Washington state hunters surprised a grizzly and then ran in opposite directions. Donivan Campbell said the bear quickly caught him by grabbing his left thigh. His friend, Chris Gregersen, heard Campbell scream and came to his aid. According to their account, Gregersen fired several shots at the bear just as it was about to bite down on Campbell’s head.

“It charged again just as quickly as it did the first time,” Gregersen said. “We have never seen an animal that was that furious, that was that terrifying.”

The hunt for the bear, which included an aerial and ground search, was unsuccessful. The closure was enacted to enable wardens to investigate the separate sites where the attacks occurred.

Using firearms versus bear spray to deter a bear attack is a personal choice that hunters often debate. One thing not debatable, though, is the danger an injured animal may pose on the landscape.

The Gravelly Mountains are used heavily by grizzly bears as well as archery hunters seeking elk in an area with good public access.

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