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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: Editorial rails loudly against noise

Chronicle editors decried the frequent blare of locomotive whistles and the daily screech of factory whistles.  (Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)
Chronicle editors decried the frequent blare of locomotive whistles and the daily screech of factory whistles. (Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)
By Jim Kershner The Spokesman-Review

The Spokane Chronicle’s editorial page went on a loud tirade against – noise.

Specifically, the editors decried the frequent blare of locomotive whistles and the daily screech of factory whistles.

“In an age that finds an alarm clock in every house, and a watch in every vest, why should locomotives whistle in the city or why should railway shops wake up everyone within a mile circle at 6 o’clock in the morning?”

Some Spokane factories insisted on sticking to the “out-of-date custom of sounding great blasts at intervals throughout the day, as if their employees did not have brains enough to read a dial and know when to start and when to stop.”

The editorial ended with this righteous blast: “The useless whistle and the useless bell are pests to the healthy and menaces to the sick. They should go.”

Perhaps one of the editors was feeling a little sleep-deprived.

From the Prohibition beat: One of the telephone booths in the Washington Drug Store, 345 W. Second Ave., had a secret door.

Customers could slide the panel open and, for $10, obtain a quart of illicit booze.

Police raided the store and found the secret panel and 50 gallons of hidden liquor.

Also on this date

(From the Associated Press)

1968: The Democratic National Convention opened in Chicago; the four-day event that resulted in the nomination of Hubert H. Humphrey for president was marked by a bloody police crackdown on antiwar protesters in the streets.

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