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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Woman suspected of biting Spokane Valley 7-Eleven clerk who confronted her about shoplifting

UPDATED: Thu., Feb. 13, 2020

From staff reports

A Spokane Valley 7-Eleven clerk told police he was bitten on the hand by a woman he was confronting for shoplifting on Wednesday night.

The woman had removed a poncho and candy bars from her pockets but insisted she didn’t have anymore items, according to a news release.

The clerk reached toward her coat pockets and she backed away, then she pushed past him to flee when he reached toward her again, according to a news release. He grabbed her wrist and she tried to pull away but fell to the ground, biting the clerk’s hand and breaking skin in the process.

The employee told the woman to leave, and she ran away, screaming, “I’m going to (expletive) kill you,” after throwing more items from the store on the ground.

Spokane Valley deputies responding to a reported fight at the store arrived to find Jordan Yukl, 27, running through the parking lot and crying, according to a news release. She matched the description of the suspect and said, “I was just assaulted,” and later, while crying, said she “didn’t want to go to jail.”

A deputy saw more items in Yukl’s pockets and the clerk reviewed video footage showing Yukl taking items from the store, the news release said. The clerk had what appeared to be bite marks on his hand.

Yukl was booked into Spokane County Jail on suspicion of second-degree robbery and felony harassment for allegedly threatening to kill the clerk. She also had an active warrant for a forgery charge.

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