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Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott tests positive for COVID-19

UPDATED: Fri., July 10, 2020

Commissioner Larry Scott speaks during the Pac-12 NCAA college basketball media day on Oct. 8, 2019, in San Francisco.   (D. Ross Cameron)
Commissioner Larry Scott speaks during the Pac-12 NCAA college basketball media day on Oct. 8, 2019, in San Francisco.  (D. Ross Cameron)
By Mike Vorel Seattle Times

Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott has tested positive for COVID-19, according to a conference release.

Scott, 55, was reportedly tested late this week after experiencing mild flu-like symptoms. As a result of the positive test, he is self-quarantining at the direction of his physician. He is continuing to carry out his normal work duties remotely.

A former professional tennis player, Scott was named commissioner of the Pac-12 (then the Pac-10) in July 2009. The New York City native graduated from Harvard in 1986 and previously served as president and COO of ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals) Properties and chairman and CEO of the Women’s Tennis Association. Scott and his wife, Cybille, live in Danville, California, and have three children: Alexander, Sebastien and Alannah.

The state of California has reported 304,297 cases of COVID-19 and 6,851 deaths, as of Thursday. Gov. Gavin Newsome added on Thursday that the state’s most recent seven-day average topped 8,000 new cases per day, a high.

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