Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Night 31° Clear
News >  World

South Korea protests border gunfire it says North started

Army soldiers walk up the stairs of their military guard post in Paju, South Korea, near the border with North Korea, Sunday, May 3, 2020. North and South Korean troops exchanged fire along their tense border on Sunday, the South's military said, blaming North Korean soldiers for targeting a guard post. (Ahn Young-joon / AP)
Army soldiers walk up the stairs of their military guard post in Paju, South Korea, near the border with North Korea, Sunday, May 3, 2020. North and South Korean troops exchanged fire along their tense border on Sunday, the South's military said, blaming North Korean soldiers for targeting a guard post. (Ahn Young-joon / AP)
Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea – South Korea said Monday it protested to North Korea over the exchange of gunfire inside their heavily fortified border that it says the North started.

South Korea said several bullets fired from North Korea hit one of its front-line guard posts on Sunday before South Korean troops fired 20 rounds of warning shots in response. It was the first shooting inside the Demilitarized Zone in about 2 1/2 years, but there were no known casualties on either side, according to South Korean defense officials.

Defense Ministry spokeswoman Choi Hyun-soo told reporters Monday that South Korea sent a message of strong protest and urged North Korea to explain the shooting and avoid similar incidents. Choi said North Korea hasn’t responded to the message.

The 155-mile-long Demilitarized Zone bisects the Korean Peninsula and is guarded by mines, barbed wire fences and combat troops on both sides. It was formed as a buffer after the end of the Korean War and officially is jointly overseen by North Korea and the American-led U.N. Command.

The U.N. Command said in a statement Monday that it was investigating if there was a violation of an armistice that ended the Korean War. South Korean military spokesman Kim Joon Rak declined to comment on the U.N. Command investigation.

The gunfire exchange happened two days after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un made a public appearance that ended a three-week absence that prompted intense rumors about his health. It also came amid deadlocked U.S. diplomatic efforts to rid North Korea of its nuclear weapons.

South Korea’s military said Sunday that a preliminary analysis showed North Korea’s firing was probably not a calculated provocation. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also said it was believed that North Korea’s firing was not intentional.

Some observers doubt it was accidental and said North Korea could plan more provocation to try to wrest diplomatic concessions.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.



Annual health and dental insurance enrollment period open now

 (Courtesy Washington Healthplanfinder)
Sponsored

2020 has been a stressful year for myriad reasons.