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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: McDonald sister sentenced for forging check after McNutt’s murder

“This defendant has so appealed to my sympathy that if I were permitted to do so, I would tell her, ‘Go woman, and sin no more,’” said the judge. (Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)
“This defendant has so appealed to my sympathy that if I were permitted to do so, I would tell her, ‘Go woman, and sin no more,’” said the judge. (Spokane Daily Chronicle archives)

Marie McDonald, one of the notorious McDonald siblings, was sentenced to between one and 20 years in the state penitentiary at Walla Walla on a charge of forgery.

A Spokane judge passed the sentence shortly after rejecting her motion for a new trial. The judge noted that the jury had expressed a recommendation that “extreme leniency” be granted in sentencing.

“This defendant has so appealed to my sympathy that if I were permitted to do so, I would tell her, ‘Go woman, and sin no more,’ ” said the judge. “The law, however, does not permit me to do so.”

Marie, along with her siblings Fay and Ted McDonald, were acquitted of murder earlier in the year when they pinned the murder of W.H. McNutt on another sibling, Will McDonald, who was still at large.

The forgery charge involved a check the McDonalds took from the murdered man and then attempted to cash.

From the bigamist beat: James P. “Bluebeard” Watson was scheduled to be escorted to the prison at San Quentin by three guards instead of the usual one.

This was apparently because of the notoriety of the convict. He pleaded guilty to murdering one of his many wives, and as many as nine more wives were still missing.

From the blackmail beat: James Neaville, of Deer Park, was formally charged with attempted blackmail by a federal grand jury and his bond set at $1,000.

Neaville was arrested while retrieving $3,000 in ransom from behind a mirror in a Spokane restroom. He had threatened to kidnap A.L. Porter’s son unless the ransom was paid.

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