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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Coeur d’Alene: Mom who rushed to be with dying ex-husband after he was shot gets more bad news

Mrs. Kate Michener, a former Spokane nurse, rushed to Coeur d'Alene from her home in Philadelphia along with her oldest son to visit her ex-husband who had recently been shot, The Spokesman-Review reported on Nov. 28, 1920. Soon, her youngest son was accused of stealing $4,500 so he could also visit his dying father, according to the mother.
Mrs. Kate Michener, a former Spokane nurse, rushed to Coeur d'Alene from her home in Philadelphia along with her oldest son to visit her ex-husband who had recently been shot, The Spokesman-Review reported on Nov. 28, 1920. Soon, her youngest son was accused of stealing $4,500 so he could also visit his dying father, according to the mother.
By Jim Kershner The Spokesman-Review

A string of unfortunate events was testing the “remarkable nervous strength,” of Mrs. Kate Michener, a former Spokane nurse.

First, her ex-husband, C.D. Michener of Coeur d’Alene, was the victim of a mysterious shooting and was in dire condition in a Spokane hospital. Mr. Michener told police that he was asleep peacefully in his bed when he suddenly felt a sharp pain in his forehead. He reached up and found his head covered in blood.

He staggered to the washbowl and started to wash off the blood when he heard his front door slam. Apparently, an intruder had entered the house, stolen money from his trousers pocket and then shot him in the head.

When Mrs. Michener found out about his condition, she immediately traveled from her Philadelphia home to be at his bedside, because she “conceived it to be her duty” even though they had divorced 15 years prior.

She also wanted her two sons to come with her but she had only enough money to bring her older son with her, leaving her younger son Elliott, 15, at home, where he was employed in the paymaster’s office of the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia.

Now, word had arrived from Philadelphia that Elliott had disappeared – and he had taken $4,500 of the company’s payroll with him. His distraught mother was convinced that “he took the money because he had expressed a desire to see his father before he died.” She believed he was on the way to Spokane.

Authorities were on the lookout for the boy on the transcontinental train routes.

Mrs. Michener said the company probably should not have allowed a 15-year-old boy the responsibility of handlinag money.

“The trouble with the lad is that he’s too bright and too venturesome,” she said. “At heart he’s the finest boy in the world.”

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