Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Cloudy 28° Cloudy
News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: Controversy surrounds Lewis and Clark High School football team players who wanted principal to be their guardian

UPDATED: Mon., Nov. 30, 2020

Several Lewis and Clark football players, including 23-year-old Raymond Duncan, testified before a judge in guardianship hearings held Nov. 30, 1920.  (S-R archives)
Several Lewis and Clark football players, including 23-year-old Raymond Duncan, testified before a judge in guardianship hearings held Nov. 30, 1920. (S-R archives)
By Jim Kershner The Spokesman-Review

A Lewis and Clark High School football controversy was unfolding in a Spokane courtroom.

Football player Raymond Duncan took the stand and admitted that he lied about his age in an earlier court hearing. He had told a judge he was 20, when he was in fact 23.

Why? Because he wanted to play football for LC.

The perjury had occurred during an earlier sworn hearing in which Duncan had petitioned for the LC principal to become his legal guardian. Duncan insisted that neither the principal nor anyone else at the school knew he was really 23, nor was he “induced to come to Spokane by anyone connected with Lewis and Clark.”

Duncan wasn’t the only LC football player who was being challenged about his guardianship status. Two other LC football players were also being questioned in court.

One boy, James Cameron, from Milton, Oregon, said he desired the LC principal to be his legal guardian mainly so he could play football.

A third boy, from Kellogg, also admitted that he wanted the LC principal to be his guardian to make him eligible for football. A fourth boy was also asking for guardianship, but his case was not heard because he was not present.

From the highway beat: A Denver man was in Spokane drumming up support for a multimillion- dollar highway project called the “Master Highway of America,” consisting of a loop encompassing all of the major national parks of the West.

This park-to-park loop highway would presumably pass through Spokane. It would provide a simple route “for any motorist to tour the entire West.”

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Active Person

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.