Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 36° Partly Cloudy
News >  Travel

New data says many Americans would take ‘Flight to Nowhere’

A Qantas flight takes off at Tullamarine Airport on July 7 in Melbourne, Australia. With the coronavirus pandemic still running amok and travel restrictions in place, several airlines are catering to those still seeking to get in an airplane by running flights to nowhere.  (Daniel Pockett/Getty Images)
A Qantas flight takes off at Tullamarine Airport on July 7 in Melbourne, Australia. With the coronavirus pandemic still running amok and travel restrictions in place, several airlines are catering to those still seeking to get in an airplane by running flights to nowhere. (Daniel Pockett/Getty Images)
By Rich Thomaselli TravelPulse

The “Flight to Nowhere” is becoming a phenomenon.

As we previously wrote, the idea of getting on a plane with no destination, flying for several hours and then returning to the same airport is gaining traction worldwide. In fact, Australia’s Qantas Airlines recently offered such a flight, and it sold out in 10 minutes.

Qantas, Taiwan’s EVA, Singapore Airlines and Japan’s ANA have all either run flights to nowhere or are about to do so.

For Qantas, the flight that left Sydney was “probably the fastest-selling flight in Qantas history,” the airline’s CEO, Alan Joyce, said in a statement.

“People clearly miss travel and the experience of flying. If the demand is there, we’ll definitely look at doing more of these scenic flights while we all wait for borders to open.”

But the concept of the flight to nowhere hasn’t quite taken off in the United States yet.

Maybe it should.

According to a new poll from Harris, almost two-thirds of Americans say they would be interested in taking a sightseeing flight or flight to nowhere.

No surprise, Gen Z/Millennials and Gen X folks, at 69% and 73%, respectively, are more likely than boomers and seniors to take such a flight. Baby boomers and senior citizens clocked in at 60% in favor and 46%, respectively.

Of those who say they are interested in a flight to nowhere, most say they would be willing to pay $260, on average.

Those who say they are interested had their reasons. They are:

• We all need a moment of escape (53%)

• It would feel like a mini-vacation (52%)

• I need a change of scenery (44%)

• Satisfy my itch to travel (38%)

• I miss flying (28%)

• To offset my cabin fever (22%)

• To create a sense of normalcy (21%)

The most recent Harris Poll was conducted on Sept. 25-28, among a nationally representative sample of 1,971 American adults.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.



Annual health and dental insurance enrollment period open now

 (Courtesy Washington Healthplanfinder)
Sponsored

2020 has been a stressful year for myriad reasons.