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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Speed limit lowered near three city parks

UPDATED: Mon., Oct. 26, 2020

The speed limit has been lowered on High Drive, a scenic but busy arterial along the bluff on Spokane’s South Hill, to 20 mph, shown Sept. 4. Corbin Park will be the next to have a lower speed limit.  (Adam Shanks / The Spokesman-Review)
The speed limit has been lowered on High Drive, a scenic but busy arterial along the bluff on Spokane’s South Hill, to 20 mph, shown Sept. 4. Corbin Park will be the next to have a lower speed limit. (Adam Shanks / The Spokesman-Review)

The Spokane City Council agreed Monday to set a 20 mph speed limit around three city parks.

The roads abutting Friendship, Corbin and Thornton Murphy parks will all have their speed limits reduced.

Spurred by Councilwoman Lori Kinnear, the Spokane City Council launched a program earlier this year that set 20 mph speed limits around more than a dozen city parks year-round.

The program, which will be piloted for two years, began with a list of 13 parks but allows neighborhood councils to request parks within their jurisdictions to be added to the list.

Speed limits are seasonally reduced around many city parks, Kinnear insisted the program be in place all year.

“There are people that don’t think that parks are used in the winter, but that’s simply not true,” Kinnear said.

Nestled between North Division and North Post streets, the oval-shaped Corbin Park is surrounded by residences on all sides.

Thornton-Murphy Park is a rectangular plot on the corner of 27th Avenue and Ray Street adjacent to the Southside Community Center, while Friendship Park is nestled in a residential block of the Shiloh Hills neighborhood.

Kinnear and her co-sponsor on the resolution that codified the program, Council President Breean Beggs, argued earlier this year that the reduced speed limits would add only seconds to a motorist’s commute but improve pedestrian safety.

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