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Eastern Washington University Football
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Former Eastern Washington kicker Nick Reynolds succumbs to kidney failure

UPDATED: Wed., Sept. 30, 2020

Nick Reynolds played football at EWU from 1998-2001. (EWU)
Nick Reynolds played football at EWU from 1998-2001. (EWU)

Former Eastern Washington University kicker and punter Nick Reynolds died Saturday of kidney failure.

Reynolds, an ex-Cheney High standout and father of two, was 40.

The 2004 EWU graduate punted 152 times in his career with a 38.8-yard average, a mark that still ranks in the top 10 in the Eagles’ record book.

Reynolds, who had a career-long punt of 60 yards, was also 7 for 13 in field-goal attempts and averaged 49 yards a kickoff.

“The time Nick and I shared during our playing days was memorable,” said EWU head coach Aaron Best, who was a teammate of Reynolds. “He represented his city, community, school, athletics and his teams with pride.

“Nick will be missed but not forgotten.”

Reynolds, an all-around football player at Cheney High, was also a record-breaking and all-state midfielder in soccer.

Memorial donations, per his obituary’s request, can be made in his name to EWU athletics’ fundraising program, the Eagle Athletic Fund.

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