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U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher announces he’s cancer-free after diagnosis in June

UPDATED: Sun., Dec. 5, 2021

U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher is seen in his Washington, D.C. office in this January 2020 photo. Fulcher announced Friday that his treatment for renal cancer had been successful.   (TYLER TJOMSLAND/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW)
U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher is seen in his Washington, D.C. office in this January 2020 photo. Fulcher announced Friday that his treatment for renal cancer had been successful.  (TYLER TJOMSLAND/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW)

U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher announced on Facebook on Friday that he was free of the renal cancer he was diagnosed with in June.

“Since being diagnosed with renal cancer 6 months ago, I’ve undergone surgery and an aggressive chemotherapy regimen,” the Idaho Republican posted Friday morning.

Fulcher, who is in the first year of his second term in Congress, thanked supporters for their “prayer, encouragement, and support.”

He also thanked the nurses and doctors that oversaw his treatment.

“God allowed this harrowing experience in my life to learn and be a better person while providing some perspective,” Fulcher wrote.

Fulcher, 59, was first elected to Congress in 2018, after serving five terms as a state senator and running unsuccessfully for Idaho governor in 2014. He serves on the committees on Natural Resources and Education and Labor.

According to the government transparency group GovTrack, Fulcher missed 30 votes in Congress between April and June of this year, but just six since then.

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