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Oldest male chimpanzee in U.S. dies at San Francisco zoo

UPDATED: Sun., June 6, 2021

In this Oct. 21, 2009 photo, Cobby, a male chimpanzee, plays with pumpkins during the San Francisco Zoo’s ‘Boo at the Zoo’ Halloween celebration in San Francisco. Cobby, the oldest male chimpanzee living in an accredited North American zoo died Saturday, June 5, 2021, at the San Francisco Zoo & Gardens. He was 63. Cobby, had been a hand-reared performing chimpanzee before he was brought to the San Francisco zoo in the 1960s.  (Russel A. Daniels)
In this Oct. 21, 2009 photo, Cobby, a male chimpanzee, plays with pumpkins during the San Francisco Zoo’s ‘Boo at the Zoo’ Halloween celebration in San Francisco. Cobby, the oldest male chimpanzee living in an accredited North American zoo died Saturday, June 5, 2021, at the San Francisco Zoo & Gardens. He was 63. Cobby, had been a hand-reared performing chimpanzee before he was brought to the San Francisco zoo in the 1960s. (Russel A. Daniels)
Associated Press

Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO – The oldest male chimpanzee living in an accredited North American zoo died Saturday at the San Francisco Zoo & Gardens. He was 63.

The chimpanzee, named Cobby, had been a hand-reared performing chimpanzee before he was brought to the San Francisco zoo in the 1960s. Although the zoo said in a news release that the chimpanzee’s cause of death had not been determined, the animal had recently been ill, and zoo officials believe old age was a factor.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature lists chimpanzees as endangered, and they are considered among the most at-risk primates in Africa due to hunting, habitat loss and disease.

The average life expectancy of the 100,000 to 200,000 chimpanzees living in the wild is 33 years, while it is between 50 and 60 years under human care, the zoo said.

Cobby was integral in bringing together the San Francisco Zoo’s chimpanzee population, officials said, and acted like the elder of the troop.

“Cobby was part of San Francisco,” said Tanya M. Peterson, executive director of the San Francisco Zoological Society, in a statement. “He touched so many lives, and people have so many memories of him. He is irreplaceable, and our hearts are broken. We will all miss seeing his handsome grey beard watching over us from the top platform of the yard.”

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