Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 62° Partly Cloudy
News >  Business

Judge OKs Boeing settlement with investors over 737 Max

UPDATED: Thu., Feb. 24, 2022

The final version of the 737 Max, the Max 10, takes off from Renton Airport in Renton, Wash., on its first flight Friday, June 18, 2021.   (Associated Press)
The final version of the 737 Max, the Max 10, takes off from Renton Airport in Renton, Wash., on its first flight Friday, June 18, 2021.  (Associated Press)
Associated Press

DALLAS — A judge has approved a $237.5 million settlement of a lawsuit in which Boeing investors accused company board members of failing to properly oversee safety issues around the 737 Max before two of the planes crashed, killing 346 people.

The investors filed the so-called derivative lawsuit on behalf of Boeing. Insurers for several current and former Boeing directors will pay the settlement to Boeing.

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, representing two funds that sued Boeing, said the settlement included needed safety reforms such as a method for employees to raise concerns and adding a board member with aviation or safety experience.

“We hope this settlement will help safeguard Boeing and the flying public against future catastrophe and protect shareholders’ long-term investments in the company,” he said.

The settlement, which was reached in November, was approved Wednesday by a court in Delaware.

Boeing and two of its subcontractors also face lawsuits by families of passengers who died in the 2018 and 2019 crashes. On Thursday, one of those families asked a federal judge in Chicago to add Boeing CEO David Calhoun and former CEO Dennis Muilenburg as defendants.

A lawyer for the parents of 24-year-old Samya Stumo said the executives have not been held accountable or acknowledged fault in connection with the second crash, which occurred five months after the first one.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Active Person

Subscribe now to get breaking news alerts in your email inbox

Get breaking news delivered to your inbox as it happens.