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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: Boy killed after his sled collided with car on Sixth Avenue

UPDATED: Mon., Jan. 10, 2022

Clifford Hawkins, 12, died when his sled crashed into a car at Sixth Avenue and Walnut Street, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Jan. 11, 1922.  (Spokesman-Review archives)
Clifford Hawkins, 12, died when his sled crashed into a car at Sixth Avenue and Walnut Street, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Jan. 11, 1922. (Spokesman-Review archives)
Clifford Hawkins, 12, died when his sled crashed into a car at Sixth Avenue and Walnut Street. The Spokesman-Review

“I didn’t see the boy on the sled at all,” said the motorist, who was driving south on Walnut Street. “The first intimation I had was when I felt a jar, as though something had hit me near the back wheel.”

The boy suffered a severe head injury and died at the emergency hospital.

The boy, who lived at the Church Home for Children, was coasting (sledding) during the noon recess at the Irving School.

School officials had banned sledding at recess because of the danger, but several boys had taken sleds to school anyway.

A resident of Sixth Avenue said he wanted steps taken to ban sledding on his street.

“There is not a more dangerous place in the city for children to coast,” said the homeowner. “… I have five children of my own and I want to see some action taken.”

From the oil beat: Government investigators found new oil seepage in the Rockwood neighborhood, only 25 feet from the original seepage.

This new seepage was found in sand about 9 feet below ground.

This constituted good news for Alfred L’Ecuyer, who had been suspected of fraud in connection with the original seepage in his basement. He had earlier been accused of dumping vegetable oil in his basement in order to fool investors.

“I have never had anything to cover up or hide, and I have gotten instructions to aid the federal agents in every way possible,” said L’Ecuyer. “Naturally, the finding of this flow of oil is gratifying to me and to those who put their trust in us.”

Investigators said they were taking a quantity of this new seepage for testing.

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