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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Spokane’s mild summer will give way to warmer temperatures next week

July 8, 2022 Updated Fri., July 8, 2022 at 7:41 p.m.

Pickleball teammates Lida Michael, left, and Rick Cobb vie for control of a volley return during a match Friday at Prairie View Park in south Spokane. The pair were competing against the husband-and-wife team of Tom and Marian Laselle.  (Dan Pelle/The Spokesman-Review)
Pickleball teammates Lida Michael, left, and Rick Cobb vie for control of a volley return during a match Friday at Prairie View Park in south Spokane. The pair were competing against the husband-and-wife team of Tom and Marian Laselle. (Dan Pelle/The Spokesman-Review)
By Nwannediya Kalu The Spokesman-Review

Spokane’s unusual mild weather will end as a stretch of 90-degree days are expected next week.

National Weather Service meteorologist Andy Brown said the mild and wet weather of the past several weeks is unusual for Spokane. Hotter and dryer weather patterns normally emerge much earlier.

“We have had a very mild spring and early summer with cooler temperatures.” Brown said.

Temperatures are expected to be in the low to mid 80s on Saturday and Sunday and will rise to about 95 on Tuesday, according to the weather service. Highs near 90 are likely at least through Friday.

Brown noted the dramatic difference in precipitation in the spring and early summer in 2021 compared to this year.

From April 1 to July 8 in 2021, there were only 0.84 inches of rain (since 1900 there was only one year that had less rain in that same time period). In 2022 there were 5.32 inches in the same stretch.

“There is more precipitation, with an extended period of cool temperatures from April to June,” Brown said.

Temperatures have been so mild that temperatures didn’t reach 70 in Spokane until May 26, 80 until June 22 and 90 until June 27. All those dates were records for how late they occurred.

By July 8 last year, Spokane had reached 90 degrees or more 18 times.

The influx of mild temperatures has caused “a delay in wildfire season,” Brown said.

Still, a report from the National Interagency Fire Center earlier this month showed that wildfire potential in much of Eastern Washington is “above normal.” Wildfire potential in Western Washington and northwest Oregon was listed at “below normal” – the only part of the West listed in that category. All of Idaho was listed as “normal.”

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