Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 42° Partly Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Nun imprisoned over peace activism, Megan Rice, dies at 91

ROSEMONT, Penn.  — Megan Rice, a nun and Catholic peace activist who spent two years in federal prison while in her 80s after breaking into a government security complex to protest nuclear weapons, has died. She was 91.

Missouri governor slams paper for uncovering data security flaw

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Republican Gov. Mike Parson on Thursday condemned one of Missouri's largest newspapers for exposing a flaw in a state database that allowed public access to thousands of teachers' Social Security numbers, even though the paper held off from reporting about the flaw until after the state could fix it.

Borrowers denied student loan relief will get a second look

Thousands of public servants who were rejected from a student loan forgiveness program will get their cases reviewed by the Education Department as part of a new settlement in a lawsuit brought by one of the nation's largest teachers unions.

Big picture, big data: Swiss unveil VR software of universe

Researchers at one of Switzerland’s top universities released open-source beta software on Tuesday that allows for virtual visits through the cosmos including up to the International Space Station, past the Moon, Saturn or exoplanets, over galaxies and well beyond.

Tensions persist between legacy of Columbus, native people

Monday’s federal holiday dedicated to Christopher Columbus is highlighting the ongoing divide between those who view the explorer as a representative of Italian American history and others horrified by an annual tribute that ignores native people whose lives and culture were forever changed by colonialism.

School boards emerge as hot races in November election

COLUMBUS, Ohio — In a school district near the Ohio state capital, school board members up for reelection this year have been subjected to a steady stream of lawsuits and attacks, both in-person and online. In another, an incumbent up for reelection who supports student mask requirements received a letter from someone angered by her stance who warned: “We are coming after you.”

Chopin portrait bought at flea market is from 19th century

WARSAW, Poland — A peeling portrait of Frederic Chopin purchased at a flea market in Poland hung modestly in a private house for almost three decades before an expert dated the painting to the 19th century, when the Polish piano composer lived.

New York City public schools to end gifted and talented program

NEW YORK — New York City will phase out its program for gifted and talented students that critics say favors whites and Asian American students, while enrolling disproportionately few Black and Latino children, in the nation's largest school system.

Red flag laws are saving lives. They could save more

Alyssa Shaw’s job is to guide Seattle-area residents through what can be one of the most wrenching and complicated experiences of their lives: petitioning civil courts to temporarily take away the firearms of a loved one in a mental health crisis who may harm themselves or others.