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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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A new COVID-19 challenge: Mutations rise along with cases

The race against the virus that causes COVID-19 has taken a new turn: Mutations are rapidly popping up, and the longer it takes to vaccinate people, the more likely it is that a variant that can elude current tests, treatments and vaccines could emerge.

Not a morning person? These genes may be to blame

In a new study of 450,000 people, researchers identified 351 genetic variants that were associated with chronotype – the scientific term for when a person prefers to sleep and wake.

In a milestone year, gene therapy finds a place in medicine

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

Researchers study the genetics of bighorn sheep

Bighorn sheep living in decades past along Idaho’s Salmon River from Riggins to its East and Middle forks far upstream were more genetically diverse, and the different groups of sheep there were more connected with each other, compared to sheep populations of today.

Studying 1 million people to end cookie-cutter health care

In a quest to end cookie-cutter health care, U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact – and to finally customize ways to prevent and treat disease.

Front Porch: Genomics exciting window into us all, Stefanie Pettit writes

We used to call it genetics, and, for most of us, it didn’t get more complicated than maybe learning a little about Gregor Mendel’s study of peas in science class and how hereditary traits could be predicted. But mostly it was about contemplating the likelihood our children would inherit Mom’s blue eyes or Grandpa’s big ears.

OSU scientists sequence genome of beaver, school mascot

Scientists at Oregon State University have sequenced the beaver genome thanks to a 2015 crowdfunding effort. The Register-Guard reported that the funding drive raised $20,001 from 103 donors. OSU used the money to pay for research on the genetic code of its mascot animal, the North American beaver.