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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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He turned life into song

The mutts, Baxter, Rockie, Bandit and Otis, miss having a yard to run in. They have been with Charlie Lee for years and now, they patiently wait for the bus door to open so they can stretch their legs. When Lee plays the harmonica, the dogs accompany him with howls; when Lee plays his guitar and sings, they quietly listen to the stories their master tells.

He’s turned life into a song

The mutts, Baxter, Rockie, Bandit and Otis, miss having a yard to run in. They have been with Charlie Lee for years and now, they patiently wait for the bus door to open so they can stretch their legs. When Lee plays the harmonica, the dogs accompany him with howls; when Lee plays his guitar and sings, they quietly listen to the stories their master tells.

Creating is her passion

Pamee Hohner’s introduction to art was a paint by numbers set given to her by her grandmother at age 9. She has been making art ever since. “I love to focus on the beauty that surrounds me; it makes me feel amazing. I am inspired by the creator of all that is good and the best artist ever,” she said. “I admire this beautiful art that I see every day and I look for it in flowers, sunsets and the stars.”

Flying Spiders creative, eclectic, fun

The Flying Spiders, a hip-hop orchestra, are pretty fly; failure to groove is not an option. Watching them perform can cause a spontaneous rising of the arms and an, all together now, “Oh yeah.” Made up of 12 or so members of different shades of skin, different shades of beliefs, and different musical backgrounds, the group’s commonality is rooted in social change. The Flying Spiders, 21st century hippies, exist simply to spread the love. “It’s about love and making the world a better place,” said frontman Isamu Jordan, adding that if he didn’t create, he’d curl up into a ball and disappear. His band members feel the same way and their passion is evident as they sway and groove while performing. Smiles rarely leave their faces and it is contagious.

Flying Spiders creative, eclectic, fun

The Flying Spiders, a hip-hop orchestra, are pretty fly; failure to groove is not an option. Watching them perform can cause a spontaneous rising of the arms and an, all together now, “Oh yeah.” Made up of 12 or so members of different shades of skin, different shades of beliefs, and different musical backgrounds, the group’s commonality is rooted in social change. The Flying Spiders, 21st century hippies, exist simply to spread the love. “It’s about love and making the world a better place,” said frontman Isamu Jordan, adding that if he didn’t create, he’d curl up into a ball and disappear. His band members feel the same way and their passion is evident as they sway and groove while performing. Smiles rarely leave their faces and it is contagious.

Ho Lan uses art, music to brighten lives

Ho Lan’s motivation comes from the desire to spread peace. Whether she’s singing, playing the guitar or percussion, composing a song, painting or even conversing with a friend or stranger, peace is at the core. “If I influence someone even a little, I am happy,” she said.

Secrest’s art captures natural beauty, serenity

Kathleen Secrest’s oil paintings and pastel drawings are all about nature. On her website, she explains, “I paint to see more closely, and I hope my observations will help others to see and value the beauty of the natural world.”

Secrest’s work captures natural beauty, serenity

Kathleen Secrest’s oil paintings and pastel drawings are all about nature. On her website, she explains, “I paint to see more closely, and I hope my observations will help others to see and value the beauty of the natural world.”

Scott sees – and creates – outside the box

Jen Scott’s work is visually stunning. From her photography and mixed media pieces to her fashion line, Scott’s creations exemplify thinking outside the box. The roots of her endeavors grow in soil that is rich with layers of complex themes – what lies between waking and sleeping, the secrets contained within silence, and the emotional, subconscious, and physical act of surrendering. Even her clothing designs contain layers of thrift store finds – surrendered items that perhaps hold secrets or memories from previous owners. Much of her work contains elements of deconstruction; images and textiles cut or torn, fractured or faded.

Lyman’s encaustic work on display during RAW event

Using the ancient medium called encaustic (to burn in), Ara Lyman applies layers of wax to wood. Dipping her brush into a palette of colored, melted beeswax, she uses a small torch to burn the layers to bond them to the ones underneath. As the colors change, the urge hits her to scratch into the surface or apply an image from her collection of vintage books and magazines. The finished product is a collage of sorts, like the piece showing an old-fashioned woman standing amid fluid and organic shapes that look like something you would find under a microscope.

Waxing artistic

Using the ancient medium called encaustic (to burn in), Ara Lyman applies layers of wax to wood. Dipping her brush into a palette of colored, melted beeswax, she uses a small torch to burn the layers to bond them to the ones underneath. As the colors change, the urge hits her to scratch into the surface or apply an image from her collection of vintage books and magazines. The finished product is a collage of sorts, like the piece showing an old-fashioned woman standing amid fluid and organic shapes that look like something you would find under a microscope.

For Art Jacobs, creation is an immersive ‘soul experience’

Art Jacobs’ name suits him. From the depths of his soul, he is an artist. It began at the age of 16 when, without formal training, he created portraits of Benjamin Banneker and Phillis Wheatley. They were displayed at a banquet in honor of Black History Month in Dayton, Ohio, and were well-received.

Speaking without talking

Art Jacobs’ name suits him. From the depths of his soul, he is an artist. It began at the age of 16 when, without formal training, he created portraits of Benjamin Banneker and Phillis Wheatley. They were displayed at a banquet in honor of Black History Month in Dayton, Ohio, and were well-received.

The Verve: Freeman Wamsley opens her own public practice

Sometimes a work of art just makes a viewer ask, “Huh?” Nontraditional artist Bridget Freeman Wamsley is OK with that. “The purpose is to take an issue, an idea or a thought and tilt it a bit, giving it a new perspective,” she said. “It starts a discourse or simply makes people walk away with a new thought in their head.”

Couple have been exploring art together since they met

Artists Alice and Chuck Harmon met over the phone. She was in Missoula, and he in Spokane. The company she worked for did business with the company he worked for. She liked his voice and he liked hers. Their first date was in Missoula on Valentine’s Day 1996. They married later that year and began a life of creative endeavors. Alice Harmon has always been creative, though it hasn’t always been easy.

Witherspoon paints her visions of love, happiness

Gay Witherspoon grew up on Long Island, N.Y. Her grandmother painted in oils and her father was a draftsman. He was a pilot who drew pictures of airplanes but after World War II, he never drew again. “I wish he had,” Witherspoon said, “but he was all about ‘not letting that out,’ if you know what I mean.”

Sharing the beauty that surrounds her

Gay Witherspoon grew up on Long Island, N.Y. Her grandmother painted in oils and her father was a draftsman. He was a pilot who drew pictures of airplanes but after World War II, he never drew again. “I wish he had,” Witherspoon said, “but he was all about ‘not letting that out’ if you know what I mean.”

Bagge’s creations are meant to challenge mainstream ideas, culture

Jason Bagge is a street artist. He doesn’t live on the street and peddle his art for loose change. Rather, he has his finger on the pulse of the street, integrating himself through mad rhymes and graffiti-type art. “My mind is always going, thinking about one art project and the next,” he said, “Straight up, I’d be in a padded cell if I didn’t have this outlet.”

Above-ground art

Jason Bagge is a street artist. He doesn’t live on the street and peddle his art for loose change. Rather, he has his finger on the pulse of the street, integrating himself through mad rhymes and graffiti-type art. “My mind is always going, thinking about one art project and the next,” he said, “Straight up, I’d be in a padded cell if I didn’t have this outlet.”

Ravencraft paintings turn heads; viewers scratch them

Artist Sean Ravencraft is on a quest. His pursuits include understanding history, the roots of humanity and struggles with depression. He studies ancient man’s anthropomorphic figures and cave paintings where animals and phenomena including suns, moons, and wind were given human characteristics. His artistic endeavors illustrate modern versions of anthropomorphic animals as well as curious works created intuitively or from dreams.