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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Greg Sargent: Who’s blocking Trump’s wall now?

One of the most mind-numbingly absurd spin games that President Donald Trump and his allies like to play on immigration is to pretend that Democrats are the only ones standing in the way of realizing his Great Border Wall fantasy.

Marc A. Thiessen: China tried to strike at Trump – and missed the mark entirely

“When you strike at a king you must kill him,” Ralph Waldo Emerson once said. Well, this year China tried to strike at President Trump for daring to launch a trade war with Beijing – and missed the mark entirely. After Trump imposed massive tariffs on Chinese goods earlier this year, Beijing responded in June with what appeared to be a clever strategy: targeting retaliatory tariffs against Trump voters in rural farming communities across the United States. China is the largest importer of U.S. soybeans, buying $14 billion of them in 2017. Three of the biggest soybean-producing states, Indiana, Missouri and North Dakota, not only voted for Trump, but also in the 2018 midterms had Democratic senators – Joe Donnell, Claire McCaskill and Heidi Heitkamp, respectively – who were up for re-election. If Beijing imposed painful tariffs on soybeans, Chinese leaders likely calculated, they could create a rift between Trump and rural voters who put him in the White House, give Senate Democrats a boost and force Trump to back down.

Ramesh Ponnuru: Trump’s tariffs could clinch the Electoral College

The market verdict is clear: Trade conflict is bad for the expected value of American companies. But so far Trump has not heeded the market signals. What might make investors blanch even more is that Trump may, from the standpoint of his re-election prospects, be right to ignore them.

U.S.: Trump lawyer met Russian who offered ‘political synergy’

President Donald Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, was in touch as far back as 2015 with a Russian who offered “political synergy” with the Trump election campaign and proposed a meeting between the candidate and Russian President Vladimir Putin, the federal special counsel said Friday.

Parkland shooting victim’s dad joins Trump for Hanukkah

The father of a Florida school shooting victim helped the White House celebrate Hanukkah on Thursday and lauded President Donald Trump as a “fighter” who has “retaken Washington for the American people.”

Trump resort hired undocumented workers, New York Times reports

NEW YORK – Two women hired to clean at one of President Donald Trump’s golf resorts in New Jersey say they were in the country illegally when they got their jobs, supervisors knew it and that many employees there also lack legal documents, according to a report in the New York Times. The Times reported on Thursday that Victorina Morales and Sandra Diaz cleaned at Trump’s golf resort Bedminster, New Jersey, for years despite not having proper documentation. Morales says she used false Social Security and permanent resident cards.

Former Attorney General William Barr contender for old job

William Barr, who served as attorney general under President George H.W. Bush, has emerged as a top contender for that job in President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, two people familiar with the president’s selection process said Thursday.

College Republicans want to build another Trump wall at WSU

The Washington State University chapter of the College Republicans wants to build another mockup of a border wall on the Pullman campus to “own the libs mercilessly” and show support for President Donald Trump’s hardline immigration proposal.

Megan McArdle: Lessons from the revolutions

If he had run in any other year, he probably never would have become president. Limited political experience, no real connection to a mainstream party and a resume that screams “out-of-touch rich guy.” The majority of the electorate clearly had someone else as their first choice. But thanks to a series of historical accidents – notably, a late-breaking scandal that fatally damaged his opponent’s chances – he now holds the highest office in the land. Given this unlikely path to office, it’s hardly surprising that his approval ratings are dismally low. Or that he faces a swelling protest movement that occasionally turns violent. The country was voting against his opponent more than it was voting for him, and now that he’s exercising the powers they reluctantly handed him, they’re none too pleased.