Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Cloudy 59° Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago About 200 people attended the ceremonial laying of the cornerstone of the new Whitworth College building three miles north of the city limits. Whitworth had moved its campus from Tacoma to Spokane after it received a grant of land.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A tie was declared in a newsboy “yelling contest” from the top of the Old National Bank building.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago About 100 children wearing blue felt hats and carrying banners marched through the Central Baptist Church in Spokane singing, “The liquor traffic must go, who wants Washington dry? I, I, I. Who will make it dry? I, I, I!”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Four men filed complaints with police about two “lady barbers” in Spokane who allegedly overcharged them for extra services.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s “local Teutons” (Germans) embarked on a campaign to supply the public with the “historical facts” which led to the great European war.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago An article in The Spokesman-Review had an ominous headline: “Warring Nations Own Big Colonies and War May Extend Over the World.”

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The Rev. James D. Crooks, 64, of Troy, Idaho, was arrested on murder charges in the death of his wife, Eliza L. Crooks, 64. Crooks told police he found his wife, a Spokane pioneer, dead in their bedroom. However, he subsequently told conflicting stories of how he found his wife, why her body was covered with bruises and why his face was covered with scratches.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A “kid fire station” was on duty 24 hours a day in the vicinity of Glass Avenue and Stone Street in Spokane.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The U.S. was not yet involved in World War I, but many Spokane residents were heading off to fight. 

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago European war news dominated the front pages as fighting began to spread. The war affected plenty of “home folks,” said The Spokesman-Review.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The City Public Market – a rough equivalent to today’s farmers markets – was apparently thriving at Stevens Street and Second Avenue.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A farmhand at Rock Island, near Wenatchee, told his fellow workers that he dreamed he had “seen” the body of Hollan Swearinger, who had drowned six weeks earlier. He said the body was in a particular stretch of the Columbia River. The other farmhands ridiculed him. Swearinger’s drowning had occurred in the Okanogan River, many miles upstream. His body was never found despite an extensive search of the Okanogan’s banks.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago The mysterious case of the disappearing Spokane mining man, Maurice H. Hare, finally was solved. He was in Los Angeles, under doctor’s care for a nervous breakdown.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Mrs. Williams, a lodging house proprietor, woke up to flames in her house in LaCrosse, in Whitman County. The fire was in a room occupied by two traveling salesmen who left on a train that night. They had apparently left a lighted candle in the room.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago A fire began in a Northport stable-garage and within 90 minutes, two-thirds of Northport’s business district was destroyed.

Jim Kershner’s this day in history

From our archives, 100 years ago Samuel R. Clemens, a Colfax farmer, had eluded capture for more than 14 years after he shot and killed a young man who had taken Clemens’ daughter to a dance against his wishes.