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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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The Verve: Bellmore has passion with array of outlets

Standing outside the northwest Spokane home, it is obvious that an artist lives there. A piece of wood hangs from the roof of the porch. On it is a hand-painted portrait of a man with the words “music and art” beneath it and, beneath that, a phone number. Another clue is the elaborate birdhouse styled after the home itself, complete with windows, a front porch and trees.

The Verve: John Bellmore has passion with array of outlets

Standing outside the northwest Spokane home, it is obvious that an artist lives there. A piece of wood hangs from the roof of the porch. On it is a hand-painted portrait of a man with the words “music and art” beneath it and, beneath that, a phone number. Another clue is the elaborate birdhouse styled after the home itself, complete with windows, a front porch and trees.

Artist has ‘up-cycled’ her life along with her art

A few years ago, Barbara Hawkins stepped off the merry-go-round. Realizing that sometimes you have to forfeit the race in order to really win, she quit the manual union job she had held for 18 years. “We used to literally run night and day, opposite shifts, dual income, two kids and chores and errands crammed into our off hours,” she said. “We were breaking down physically and mentally, running on four hours of sleep and eating drive-thru food on the way to the next thing. It was sucking the life out of us. So we decided to drop to one income, but make a richer life for ourselves.”

Former graphic artist has eased into freer style

Lisa Waddle is an emerging artist who has been emerging for years. It began in her youth when her grandmother bought her large boxes of art supplies for Christmas. Waddle loved how her senses were aroused by the colors, the smells of the paints or clay, and the textures of the different media. As she experimented, it seems, her fate was sealed: She was to become an artist. Waddle, 39, earned a degree in graphic design from Spokane Falls Community College and worked in that field for a while. She and her husband moved to northwest Spokane neighborhood about 11 years ago, and she began earnestly painting again. Working as a graphic designer left her work more controlled than she would have liked, but in time it began to flow.

Emerging artists offer diverse views

Through Feb. 28, five emerging artists are showing their work at The Elk Public House, 1931 W. Pacific Ave., in Browne’s Addition. Kyle West has been setting up art exhibits at the restaurant since 2008.

Piper Swaney’s journey led her to Asian-inspired art

Piper Swaney keeps a diary, a visual diary, representing her emotions in oil paint. She often asks herself why she is bringing forth a certain image and months later, she will recognize that the finished piece somehow corresponds to what she was going through at that time. “I’m processing emotions,” she said, “and processing the world.”

Piper Swaney’s journey led her to Asian-inspired art

Piper Swaney keeps a diary, a visual diary, representing her emotions in oil paint. She often asks herself why she is bringing forth a certain image and months later, she will recognize that the finished piece somehow corresponds to what she was going through at that time. “I’m processing emotions,” she said, “and processing the world.”

The Verve: EWU student gets creative in hard times

While fairly common, depression is not a subject of casual conversation. Still, whether diagnosed or simply experienced, many of us have had exposure. Medication might dull dark thoughts, but artist Beau Ferderer chooses to dive head-on into his emotions, painting narratives of an apocalyptic nature. “When I’m at my lowest, I usually paint,” he said. “I’m not a 2012, end-of-the-world fanatic, though it is impossible to believe that the world will last forever. This is more of a mental apocalypse.”

Art of darkness

While fairly common, depression is not a subject of casual conversation. Still, whether diagnosed or simply experienced, many of us have had exposure. Medication might dull dark thoughts, but artist Beau Ferderer chooses to dive head-on into his emotions, painting narratives of an apocalyptic nature. “When I’m at my lowest, I usually paint,” he said. “I’m not a 2012, end-of-the-world fanatic, though it is impossible to believe that the world will last forever. This is more of a mental apocalypse.”

Teen rapper releases pent-up feelings through music

At 17, Aubrey Major, a senior at West Valley High School, is ahead of the game. While many of her peers are still seeking their own forms of expression, Major is telling her stories in the form of poetry set to rhythmic beats. She is a rapper. It began less than a year ago when Major attended a show where a female rapper, Dime City, was performing.

Deubel explores range of emotions with her art

Christina Deubel’s earliest memory of a medium conducive to creative expression is that flat pencil used by carpenters. Her grandfather was a carpenter, and he would sharpen the pencil with a pocket knife and hand it to her. Raised on a farm, she took that pencil and drew what she knew best.

ART AND SOUL

Christina Deubel’s earliest memory of a medium conducive to creative expression is that flat pencil used by carpenters. Her grandfather was a carpenter and he would sharpen the pencil with a pocket knife and hand it to her. Raised on a farm, she took that pencil and drew what she knew best. “I started drawing cows; I would look through the bull semen catalogs and draw the biggest, toughest-looking bulls,” she said, “My mom must have had about a billion shots of very anatomy-correct bulls. She noticed a skill in me at a young age and started entering me into competitions. I loved it, I drew all the time.”

Exhibit will feature EWU undergraduate art students’ visions

Accessible through Luxe Coffee House, 1017 W. First Ave., is a ballroom-size space. Called De-Luxe, the space is gearing up for its first large art exhibit, hosted by a group of art students from Eastern Washington University. This small group of promising artists in their last year of undergraduate education are working to contribute to the area’s art scene, taking it upon themselves to insert their work into the cultural dialogue of Spokane while building relationships with the community.

Jennifer Gray’s art looks beyond appearances

When Jennifer Gray smiles, her eyes twinkle and it looks like she knows something; within her lies the answer to a simple yet abstract concept: happiness. Even her artwork seems to contain a mysterious answer. Dark, abstract and partially figurative, her work oozes wholeness and an understanding that, while we’re all missing something, wholeness can be obtained. “I leave bits out of my figures because my feeling is that people are not all there. I don’t give them faces because I want them to relay a feeling and not be looked at as a person,” she explained. “My work is dark but I try to give each shape sensual grace. I guess I am trying to say there is beauty in all forms.”

Creating is therapy for painter with painful past

Karie Cooper is another example of the healing power of art. Her firsthand knowledge in the healing and therapeutic value of art has led her to the path of art therapy. Hour upon hour, her hands work tiny brushes and tools; the final products illustrate her love of color and desire to bring peaceful reflection to others. Called Zen art, her paintings and handmade jewelry reflect what creating art means to her. “A place where I can be at peace,” she said.

Healing arts

Karie Cooper is another example of the healing power of art. Her firsthand knowledge in the healing and therapeutic value of art has led her to the path of art therapy. Hour upon hour, her hands work tiny brushes and tools; the final products illustrate her love of color and desire to bring peaceful reflection to others. Called Zen art, her paintings and handmade jewelry reflect what creating art means to her. “A place where I can be at peace,” she said.

The Verve: Hess continuously seeking new themes, media

Janet Hess exudes the kind of joy a child experiences in a toy store; she is curious and constantly inspired by the world around her. “I want to do unpredictable art,” she said. “I want to evolve with my art, to be a better person as I become a better artist. I want to view the world around me in new, unknown and incredibly beautiful ways. I want to surprise even myself with interesting art that reflects those views.”

The Verve: Janet Hess makes a lifestyle of seeking out new themes, media

Janet Hess exudes the kind of joy a child experiences in a toy store; she is curious and constantly inspired by the world around her. “I want to do unpredictable art,” she said. “I want to evolve with my art, to be a better person as I become a better artist. I want to view the world around me in new, unknown and incredibly beautiful ways. I want to surprise even myself with interesting art that reflects those views.”

The Verve: Distance puts Palmer’s paintings into place

Charles W. Palmer has a MacGyver-ish way about him; after spending time with him you’ll come to realize that he could probably get by with a roll of duct tape and an army knife. The only difference would be that while Palmer is a “guy’s guy” like MacGyver, Palmer takes aesthetics into account; beauty, not necessity, inspires him. Palmer can make beautiful bows and arrows out of natural materials; he can rebuild a rifle, make a knife or jewelry from stone, build a table or a frame for his stretched canvases.

Octogenarian potter shares product of lifelong love of clay

Adam Scoggin first found creative joy painting in elementary school, building in high school shop class and developing film in a darkroom through his 20s. With a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the College of Idaho and a master’s degree in counseling from Claremont in California, creatively expressing himself took a back seat to financial security for his family.