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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Treasure in mud

Adam Scoggin first found creative joy painting in elementary school, building in high school shop class and developing film in a darkroom through his 20s. With a bachelor’s degree in English literature from the College of Idaho and a master’s degree in counseling from Claremont in California, creatively expressing himself took a back seat to financial security for his family. For years he nurtured others as a minister, an elementary school teacher, a junior high school counselor, a special education teacher and a drug and alcohol counselor. In his 80 years, Scoggin has been in a lot of places. His love for clay began when he was “strolling through an arts and crafts fair at Scripps College one Saturday,” he writes on his website. “Beautiful pottery and their creator’s personalities and clay weathered hands touched me as if those same hands were laid on my head. I wanted to be one of them.”

The Verve: Her memory is her muse

If you hear strange sounds coming from the garage attached to Stephanie Sammons’ Liberty Lake home, she’s in there using saws and drills, deconstructing found objects and reconstructing them. When it’s quiet, she is inside the house, creating her serious yet playful mixed-media portraits or she’s at Eastern Washington University pursuing a master’s in art therapy. The reasoning behind her endeavors is simple; art “saved” her and she, in turn, hopes her skills might somehow save others.

Her memory is her muse

If you hear strange sounds coming from the garage attached to Stephanie Sammons’ Liberty Lake home, she’s in there using saws and drills, deconstructing found objects and reconstructing them. When it’s quiet, she is inside the house, creating her serious yet playful mixed-media portraits or she’s at Eastern Washington University pursuing a master’s in art therapy. The reasoning behind her endeavors is simple; art “saved” her and she, in turn, hopes her skills might somehow save others.

The Verve: Sober a year, he returns to art

Looking at Brian Houghton’s body of artwork, one might surmise that his imagination resides in a crude yet futuristic world where Tina Turner reigns over the Thunder Dome and bones, chains, gas masks and obsolete mechanics dress inhabitants and the surrounding landscape. Some of his mask pieces are fashioned after Dr. Schnabel von Rom’s mask that was shaped like a crow (a bird thought to be pest proof) and stuffed with a concoction of purifying herbs to protect him from the plague in the 17th century.

Ar tist emerges

Looking at Brian Houghton’s body of artwork, one might surmise that his imagination resides in a crude yet futuristic world where Tina Turner reigns over the Thunder Dome and bones, chains, gas masks and obsolete mechanics dress inhabitants and the surrounding landscape. Some of his mask pieces are fashioned after Dr. Schnabel von Rom’s mask that was shaped like a crow (a bird thought to be pest proof) and stuffed with a concoction of purifying herbs to protect him from the plague in the 17th century.

Turner Sisters teach around the globe

The Turner Sisters and their mother turn back the pages to a time when meetings took place around a crackling fire or on a front porch. They ignore language barriers and cultural differences, playing music that connects with listeners from all walks of life. “I enjoy the way music acts as a universal language. I have friends all over the world, with whom I would otherwise have little in common,” said Trinity Turner. “But thanks to music, we have quite a bit in common. Sometimes music is even better than spoken language at expressing what we are thinking. This is really something special to me.”

Musical ambassadors

The Turner Sisters and their mother turn back the pages to a time when meetings took place around a crackling fire or on a front porch. They ignore language barriers and cultural differences, playing music that connects with listeners from all walks of life. “I enjoy the way music acts as a universal language. I have friends all over the world, with whom I would otherwise have little in common,” said Trinity Turner. “But thanks to music, we have quite a bit in common. Sometimes music is even better than spoken language at expressing what we are thinking. This is really something special to me.”

Cheney artist tells his stories with intricate ink drawings

Buck Mountain is a lot like his artwork: a bit of an enigma. His work looks a bit like a puzzle; traditional images including wildlife and cowboys and Indians mixed with a sort of strange language (one piece even contains profanities banned by the Federal Communications Commission hidden within.) Akin to crop circles and cave drawings, his work tells stories and somehow resonates with a viewer. Deeply intricate, the artist and his work are rooted in nature and the world’s ancestral collective with hints of the 21st century and beyond.

Napolsky plays with the watercolors of life

Fabian Napolsky is driven to paint. Mixing color with water is not a hobby for the artist, it’s a challenging, fulfilling and exciting creative process that expands beyond the edges of the paper. “There is a huge spiritual quality to creating art,” he said. “It encompasses the world and has a certain energy.”

The watercolors of life

Fabian Napolsky is driven to paint. Mixing color with water is not a hobby for the artist, it’s a challenging, fulfilling and exciting creative process that expands beyond the edges of the paper. “There is a huge spiritual quality to creating art,” he said. “It encompasses the world and has a certain energy.”

Valley painter shows world’s beauty, damage in landscapes

Clara Woods makes things more clear and fixes what is damaged. She does art restoration, touching up aged pieces by artists including Charles Russell or contemporary artist’s work that has been torn during transport. With her own art, she tries to clearly illustrate her view of the world’s beautiful parts as well as its damaged parts. She touches upon religion, poetry and memories depicted figuratively or in landscapes. There is depth in her work; hidden meanings felt but somehow just out of reach. Even the artist isn’t quite sure where the images come from. “They just come out,” she said. “I create art because I have to. It leaves me no choice.”

Evans uses ‘shoes, clothes, whatever’ to share inspiration

Kadra Evans, 30, has only recently lifted the shovel to begin construction on her path to creative expression. Her sly smile speaks volumes; this is just the tip of the iceberg. “I plan on getting much more elaborate and detailed with my designs.” In the past, Evans has worked in restaurants and as a paraeducator. About five years ago, she started painting a bit on canvas. “My boyfriend at the time had taken me to my first concert and the music and the scene inspired me, so I started painting album covers on canvas of the bands we had seen. Then my friends started buying them from me and referring their friends. The fashion part, well honestly, Ronnie forced me into it.”

Beyond the canvas medium

Kadra Evans, 30, has only recently lifted the shovel to begin construction on her path to creative expression. Her sly smile speaks volumes; this is just the tip of the iceberg. “I plan on getting much more elaborate and detailed with my designs.” In the past, Evans has worked in restaurants and as a paraeducator. About five years ago, she started painting a bit on canvas. “My boyfriend at the time had taken me to my first concert and the music and the scene inspired me, so I started painting album covers on canvas of the bands we had seen. Then my friends started buying them from me and referring their friends. The fashion part, well honestly, Ronnie forced me into it.”

Spokane art exhibit explores where people take root

It is common knowledge that if you follow a map, figuratively or literally, you’ll get where you need to go. Sure there are bumps and adventures along the way, but home is where everything leads Like Dorothy said, there’s no place like home.

Couple’s life imbued with art

Artists Bill and Karma Simmons reside in Hangman Valley in an environment conducive to creativity. It is a barn/studio/home surrounded by nature and sculptures made by them. Driving up the dirt road to their place, it looks like a large barn or garage; wood logs kept in place by grout make up the tall walls flanking the garage doors. Upon entry is a lifestyle completely integrated with art. “It’s pretty simple,” Bill Simmons said, “We like to eat and drink wine and we make stuff. It’s a nice creative life.”

Lives are imbued with art

Artists Bill and Karma Simmons reside in Hangman Valley in an environment conducive to creativity. It is a barn/studio/home surrounded by nature and sculptures made by them. Driving up the dirt road to their place, it looks like a large barn or garage; wood logs kept in place by grout make up the tall walls flanking the garage doors. Upon entry is a lifestyle completely integrated with art. “It’s pretty simple,” Bill Simmons said, “We like to eat and drink wine and we make stuff. It’s a nice creative life.”

The Verve: Pair’s exhibit a rare event

Many artists refer to their creative habits as a sort of compulsion, an unstoppable force urging them to create. While many of those artists share their work with others at shows or galleries, others simply fill their homes with what they’ve made where only family and friends are privy to their creative spirits. Kat Hill and David Boshart are these kinds of artists – content to let the creative urge take over with or without an audience. But on Sept. 24, they will briefly unveil their work at Manic Moon Studios, 1625 N. Monroe St.

Artists light up Broadway for sale

In true grassroots fashion, Art on Broadway was not conceived in a boardroom with a list of rules but in Bert McCollum’s shower, where a light bulb appeared over her head and she thought “why not?” Her business, Shear Illusions, has plenty of surrounding grounds on a busy corner at Argonne Road and Broadway Avenue in Spokane Valley and she knows plenty of creative people, including artist and hairstylist Debbie McCulley. The duo then got to work, putting together the first Art on Broadway event scheduled for Saturday. “There are so many artists wanting to find a venue to sell their work,” McCulley said, “Things have fallen into place nicely.”

Lea Anne Scott among featured artists in studio tour

Spokane’s eighth annual Town and Country Studio Tour is scheduled Sept. 17-18, when six artists’ studios on the South Hill will be open to the public. Artist Lea Anne Scott is participating for the first time, unveiling her newly built studio and her hand-formed cement garden sculptures alongside a half-dozen other artists who will set up their creations for display on the surrounding grounds.

Nature of art

Spokane’s eighth annual Town and Country Studio Tour is scheduled Sept. 17-18, when six artists’ studios on the South Hill will be open to the public. Artist Lea Anne Scott is participating for the first time, unveiling her newly built studio and her hand-formed cement garden sculptures alongside a half-dozen other artists who will set up their creations for display on the surrounding grounds.