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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Medical marijuana push advancing on two fronts in Idaho

BOISE – Conservative Idaho might not seem like the most fertile ground for a medical marijuana movement, but supporters have launched an initiative drive that could change the terms of the debate. The reason: Seventy-four percent of Idahoans say they support allowing “terminally and seriously ill patients to use and purchase marijuana for medical purposes.” That was in this year’s Boise State University public policy survey, a result so overwhelmingly favorable that researchers initially thought it had to be wrong.

Spokane group collecting signatures for city medical marijuana initiative

Spokane citizens could soon have their say on the controversy growing locally and statewide on the enforcement of marijuana laws. Citizens for a Sensible Spokane, a group that supports legalization of the drug, is collecting signatures for an initiative to make possession of marijuana by adults the city’s lowest law enforcement priority. The proposal is similar to one approved by Seattle voters in 2003.

Lawmakers turn to AG for advice on medical marijuana bill

OLYMPIA – A few days after a Democratic governor vetoed most of a new medical marijuana bill, House Democrats are asking her possible Republican replacement for a little help in crafting a new bill. The 15 legislators, including Spokane’s Andy Billig, signed a letter asking Attorney General Rob McKenna for help drafting a statute that would do some of the things Gov. Chris Gregoire vetoed out of the medical marijuana bill that cleared both legislative chambers.

Pot bill tamped down

OLYMPIA – State workers will not be licensing medical marijuana growers or dispensaries, and patients will not be able to sign on to a registry that could save them from arrest. Gov. Chris Gregoire vetoed most of a bill Friday afternoon that would have established a state structure for the production and sale of medical marijuana, saying she feared state workers involved in the system would face federal prosecution.

Gregoire vetoes most of marijuana bill

OLYMPIA – State workers will not be licensing medical marijuana growers or dispensaries, and patients will not be able to sign onto a registry that could save them from arrest. Gov. Chris Gregoire vetoed most of a bill Friday afternoon that would have established a state structure for the production and sale of medical marijuana, saying she feared state workers involved in the system would face federal prosecution. “

Marijuana bill supported

OLYMPIA – Federal agents are unlikely to arrest state workers for regulating medical marijuana in Washington, despite warnings from two federal prosecutors, a constitutional law expert told Gov. Chris Gregoire on Thursday. If they did, it might be the first time since America’s Civil War that state workers were personally prosecuted for doing a job required by a state statute, said Hugh Spitzer, a University of Washington law professor and one of the state’s top constitutional scholars.

Gregoire set to veto part of medical marijuana bill

OLYMPIA — The Senate gave final passage this morning to a bill that attempts to regulate medical marijuana production and sales, setting up a possible showdown with the governor, who opposes provisions for state employees regulating different aspects of the system.