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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Beyond words

Carl Richardson, the youngest of eight children, is a man of few words. Perhaps he allowed his siblings to do most of the talking as he listened and observed. His father was in the military and they traveled from Delaware to Florida, to the Philippines then back to Florida. What remained constant was family, a thing important to Richardson, and what was fostered was his ability to communicate without saying a word. “Because words fail, I choose paint, ink, canvas, paper, film, pen, charcoal and/or a squeegee to give a voice to thoughts, feeling and emotions within me,” he writes on his website.

Painting, poetry important parts of Gray’s journey to self-discovery

Ryan Gray is, like most, on a journey. This road through life on which we travel is full of distractions – signs, shops and roadblocks litter the way. Gray seems less distracted than most, more like a man on a mission to set up his own signs in the form of paintings as reminders to himself or others to express yourself.

On the road to find out

Ryan Gray is, like most, on a journey. This road through life on which we travel is full of distractions – signs, shops and roadblocks litter the way. Gray seems less distracted than most, more like a man on a mission to set up his own signs in the form of paintings as reminders to himself or others to express yourself.

The Verve: Artist thrives on unpredictability, eclecticism

If you were to have happened into Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave., last month, you would have seen over three dozen works of art there – photography, stained glass, and paintings done in many styles including abstract, impressionism, pop art, and realism. You would imagine that at least a half-dozen artists were displaying their work because of the diverse nature of the exhibit, but it was just one. “If I was to describe my work I would say eclectic,” said artist Valerie Lindberg. “I don’t think my work is totally recognizable because at this point it varies significantly. 

South Hill artist finds inspiration in transposing elements

Upon entering Michael Sherriffs Hall’s South Hill home, you are at once transported into a gallery of strange landscapes where even the figurative pieces appear organic. In the main living room, more than a dozen square canvases, some stacked by threes, sit on a built-in shelf above eye level. On a dark background, the paintings look like rock formations or twisted roots, but they are actually hands, sets of hands posing, almost interacting in a sort of hand language. It is a visually stunning, curious and thought-provoking display.

Groups seek to create dialogue, social change through art

Last year, tree stumps were placed randomly on the streets of downtown Spokane. On the tree stumps sat glass jars filled with clear liquid and long bubble making wands. Words on the jar explained: “Leave a sorrow behind you. Remember the innocence inside you.” This is the kind of thing that “Boys Who Like Butterflies” and “Black Rabbit Magic,” two groups that attempt to instigate dialogue and social change through visual and interactive means, do.

Groups seek to create dialogue, social change through artwork

Last year, tree stumps were placed randomly on the streets of downtown Spokane. On the tree stumps sat glass jars filled with clear liquid and long bubble making wands. Words on the jar explained: “Leave a sorrow behind you. Remember the innocence inside you.” This is the kind of thing that “Boys Who Like Butterflies” and “Black Rabbit Magic,” two groups that attempt to instigate dialogue and social change through visual and interactive means, do.

Prior’s art explores how every idea, emotion, person connects

Sarah Prior’s artwork encompasses all. Driven by an aversion to separatism, a thing that some religions embrace, she paints things that illustrate her belief that we are all connected. “What happens to me and you does matter and does affect the whole,” she said, “Through my work, I try to show the beauty and perfection in our simple and magnificent existence.”

The Verve

Sarah Prior’s artwork encompasses all. Driven by an aversion to separatism, a thing that some religions embrace, she paints things that illustrate her belief that we are all connected. “What happens to me and you does matter and does affect the whole,” she said, “Through my work, I try to show the beauty and perfection in our simple and magnificent existence.”

The Verve: Halley’s Comet digs deep to craft their music

Skyler Galle and Jenelle Knie met online less than a year ago after years of looking for that perfect someone, someone who shares the same passion, someone who’s “been there” and “gets it.” Galle and Knie make up the alternative musical duo Halley’s Comet, and their goal is to create something rare and beautiful like the celestial phenomenon they are named after.

The Verve: Halley’s Comet digs deep to craft their music

Skyler Galle and Jenelle Knie met online less than a year ago after years of looking for that perfect someone, someone who shares the same passion, someone who’s “been there” and “gets it.” Galle and Knie make up the alternative musical duo Halley’s Comet, and their goal is to create something rare and beautiful like the celestial phenomenon they are named after.

The Verve: Volkswagen specialist broadens horizons

Craig Yelley is a handy guy. Seriously, it just takes checking out his house and man-cave to figure out that he knows his way around tools. “I started tearing stuff apart and putting them back together when I was a kid,” he said. Referring to the kitchen in his Vinegar Flats house, he said he’s been remodeling for over a month; he tore down a wall and built new countertops that look like shiny wood. In his shop, the carcasses of Volkswagen buses wait to be reborn. “Tinkering with stuff and building things are my personal pleasure,” he said, “I do it to quiet the demons inside.”

The Verve: Volkswagen specialist broadens horizons

Craig Yelley is a handy guy. Seriously, it just takes checking out his house and man-cave to figure out that he knows his way around tools. “I started tearing stuff apart and putting them back together when I was a kid,” he said. Referring to the kitchen in his Vinegar Flats house, he said he’s been remodeling for over a month; he tore down a wall and built new countertops that look like shiny wood. In his shop, the carcasses of Volkswagen buses wait to be reborn. “Tinkering with stuff and building things are my personal pleasure,” he said, “I do it to quiet the demons inside.”

Gabriel Vrooman brings color, vibrancy to a gray world

Gabriel Vrooman lives the epitome of the opposite of the American dream, or at least the dream we have been taught to strive for since we were able to handle a remote. The white picket fence, credit cards, a full closet and refrigerator, a car, a big-screen television and tropical vacations are examples of things most of us work for – while Vrooman is content with a bicycle, a laptop, the clothes on his back, and an array of art supplies often found in a Dumpster or earned in exchange for his art.

Gabriel Vrooman brings color, vibrancy to a gray world

Gabriel Vrooman lives the epitome of the opposite of the American dream, or at least the dream we have been taught to strive for since we were able to handle a remote. The white picket fence, credit cards, a full closet and refrigerator, a car, a big-screen television and tropical vacations are examples of things most of us work for – while Vrooman is content with a bicycle, a laptop, the clothes on his back, and an array of art supplies often found in a Dumpster or earned in exchange for his art.

Hotrum turns simple beauty of cursive writing from past into art

Kassidi Hotrum seems much older than her 21 years. “When I was 12, my mother told me I was more like 40,” she said. Perhaps it’s her mellow disposition or her fondness for old things like books, records, vintage furniture, and good old-fashioned conversation across tables.

The Verve: Teen finding own voice in art

A few of the many human universal desires include having the ability to communicate with others, to connect and to find our places and our roles within society. Sometimes, these things are not so easy, especially when one is living with a disorder that affects communication. “Autism is a communication disorder,” said Wendy Frye. Her son James Frye, 17, was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Her heart filled with fear; uncertain of his future, a ray of sunshine and of hope has recently broken through as he has declared himself an artist, ultimately finding his own form of communication through art.

Teen finding own voice in art

A few of the many human universal desires include having the ability to communicate with others, to connect and to find our places and our roles within society. Sometimes, these things are not so easy, especially when one is living with a disorder that affects communication. “Autism is a communication disorder,” said Wendy Frye. Her son James Frye, 17, was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Her heart filled with fear; uncertain of his future, a ray of sunshine and of hope has recently broken through as he has declared himself an artist, ultimately finding his own form of communication through art.

Art in the family way

Emerging artist Amberle Madden had, at one point, decided art wasn’t for her. As a teen, she watched her father, Roch Fautch, leave a successful job in construction in order to follow his heart and become an artist. “It was kind of hard watching him struggle,” she said. Still, genetics, something inherited or the simple desire to universally communicate with others led her to art.