Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Cloudy 26° Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.


Blood donations pour in for Vegas victims

So when Urdesich heard Bloodworks Northwest was collecting blood donations to support Las Vegas hospitals, she rolled up her sleeve and helped the best way she knew how. Urdesich was a regular blood donor in Nevada.

‘He was raised right’: Vegas victims remembered

It’s been nearly a week since hundreds of people lost their mothers, their fathers, their brothers, sisters, husbands, wives and friends. But it’s only the beginning of grief for the families and friends mourning the lives of the 58 Americans and Canadians who died when a gunman opened fire at a Las Vegas country concert Sunday night.

A casino regular, quiet but prickly, unleashes a rampage

Last week, Stephen Paddock returned to the Las Vegas Strip, where he spent many hours and thousands of dollars at high-limit video poker machines, and eyed the fun-seekers crowding his oasis. But this time he did so from a 32nd floor casino hotel suite. Then he smashed open a pair of windows with a hammer and opened fire with a carefully assembled arsenal, murdering 58 fans gathered at an outdoor country music concert and injuring 500 more before killing himself.

Restrictions on ‘bump stock’ would take action from Congress

The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives could reconsider the lawfulness of “bump stock” devices like the ones used by the Las Vegas gunman only if Congress amends existing gun laws or passes new legislation banning the accessories that allow semi-automatic rifles to mimic machine guns.

Frustrated police appeal for public’s help in Vegas case

After five days of scouring the life of Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock and chasing 1,000 leads, investigators confessed Friday they still don’t know what drove him to mass murder, and they announced plans to put up billboards appealing for the public’s help.