Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Cloudy 35° Cloudy

Tag search results

Tags let us describe our content with keywords, making it easier to find what you're most interested in. Use the search box to look for tags, or explore our coverage with the lists below.

B-17 Flying Fortress crashes

A B-17 bomber dating to World War II apparently made an emergency landing today in a cornfield outside Chicago before it was consumed by fire while the seven people aboard escaped uninjured, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. (AP)

Pearl Harbor survivor dies

Ray Daves, the Navy radioman who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor and the sinking of the USS Yorktown during the Battle of Midway, died Friday at the Spokane Veterans Home. He was 91. Daves, a retired air traffic controller who lived in Deer Park, died two days after his birthday, said Carol Edgemon Hipperson, who recounted Daves’ life in “Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific.” His passing also comes three months after the air traffic control tower at Spokane International Airport was named in his honor.

‘Radioman,’ tower namesake, dies at age 91

Ray Daves, the Navy radioman who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor and the sinking of the USS Yorktown during the Battle of Midway, died Friday at the Spokane Veterans Home. He was 91. Daves, a retired air traffic controller who lived in Deer Park, died two days after his birthday, said Carol Edgemon Hipperson, who recounted Daves’ life in “Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific.” His passing also comes three months after the air traffic control tower at Spokane International Airport was named in his honor.

Living history lesson

Students in Marcy James’ humanities class at Central Valley High School received a taste last week of what it was like to be on a minesweeper in the Pacific during World War II. Radarman 2nd Class Del Spear, 85, visited the class and assigned students positions on the minesweeper USS YMS-302, the boat on which Spear served.

Priest meets paratrooper who liberated his town during WWII

Lying in a hospital bed, his heart failing, Allan Wood met a priest. The two were sharing a room at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center when Wood discerned the priest’s Dutch accent. They struck up a conversation, and soon these two men, ages 89 and 88, uncovered a shared experience from decades ago that molded their lives.

Farewell to a veteran

When the nation commemorated Pearl Harbor Day last month, there was one less eyewitness to tell the tale of the surprise attack that awoke a sleeping giant on Dec. 7, 1941. Pearl Harbor survivor Jim Sinnott died Nov. 9, surrounded by his loved ones at the Spokane Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He was 87.

State’s WWII memorial on Capitol campus restored

OLYMPIA – The “ghosts” of World War II have returned to the Capitol campus while there are still some veterans of that conflict left to appreciate them. On the 69th anniversary of the day the United States was pulled into that war with the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Washington departments of Veterans Affairs and General Administration will rededicate the state’s World War II Memorial, which features etched images of servicemen and families on the home front.

World War II bride ties knot with U.S.

What a shame that Dan Surean didn’t live to see his lovely Mary finally become a U.S. citizen on Tuesday. “He would be absolutely in a joy world,” said Mary Surean, from Bedford, England, who at age 86 joined 44 other immigrants in taking the Oath of Citizenship before U.S. Magistrate Judge Cynthia Imbrogno in Spokane.

Medal of Honor recipient Baker buried at Arlington

ARLINGTON, Va. – A caisson drawn by seven white horses carried Vernon J. Baker to his final resting place in Arlington National Cemetery today under the solemn watch of the 3rd Infantry Regiment Honor Guard – starched and sharp in full dress blues despite the stifling September sun.

Friends, memories come together during war ceremony

Shortly after World War II in 1946, Farragut Naval Training Depot was closed and deactivated. By war’s end, 293,381 recruits passed through the base. It was in fact the second-largest naval training base in the country. What many don’t know about Farragut was that in addition to basic training, several technical training battalions were operated from the base, as well as a camp dedicated to returning wounded. The hospital at the base was the second largest in the country.

Community turns out to honor Baker

St. Maries, IDAHO – Vernon Baker comforted a neighbor who had just lost his father and volunteered his labor to a newcomer the first time they met. He was gracious and humble – a hero not only for his courage under fire, but also for the way he honored 19 soldiers from his platoon who died during a decisive attack on a key German stronghold in April 1945.

World War II hero Vernon Baker dies

Vernon Baker, the only living black World War II veteran to receive the Medal of Honor – the nation's highest commendation for battlefield valor – died at his home south of St. Maries, Idaho on Tuesday.

WWII warplanes visit Spokane

Three restored World War II airplanes – a B-17, a B-24 and a P-51 – arrived Monday, June 28, 2010, at Spokane International Airport, where they will be on display to spectators until 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 29, 2010, as part of the Collings Foundation's Wings of Freedom Tour. The B-24 and P-51 are the only remaining models of their kind that still fly. Visitors can make a suggested donation to view the inside of the aircraft or buy premium tickets to take a 30- or 60-minute flight. More information and pricing can be found at the Collings Foundation website.

Vet featured in S-R series dies

John Wills, a World War II veteran who was featured in The Spokesman-Review's Voices of War series in 2008, has died.