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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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The Great Pumpkin Arrives

Tony Schuh uses power tools to carve a 100-pound gourd into a jack-o'-lantern at St. Charles School Friday.

Trick to Halloween is brushing

Halloween is Saturday and that means candy, candy, candy. I have fond memories of chocolate, caramel apples, popcorn balls and candy corn. As an adult I indulge in a few of these treats this time of year – for nostalgia, if nothing else. Only now I limit the amounts and make sure I brush and floss my teeth after eating sweets.

Slimy and scary goodies are Halloween favorites

Murky, dark and swampy isn’t a description often applied to good food. Except around Halloween, of course, when the swampier the better. And in her holiday specialty magazine, “Martha Stewart Halloween Spirited Celebrations,” Stewart delivers frights and flavor. A duo of green glop actually is a pair of delicious dips – guacamole with black beans and a tomatillo salsa verde. To stick with the dark theme, serve them with blue tortilla chips.

Recovered gun linked to shooting at nightclub

A gun police say was used in a deadly Spokane shooting that killed one and injured two others was found south of Chewelah. The weapon had been disassembled and thrown off a steep hillside, Spokane police Sgt. Joe Peterson said.

shoppers not spooked

Sarah Palin has been flying out the door, with nurses and police officers in hot pursuit. Tombstones and bats are popular, too. When it comes to spending on Halloween costumes, candy and decorations, Inland Northwest shoppers aren’t pinching pennies, retailers say.

Idaho sex offenders on Halloween list

Probation and parole officers will work with local law enforcement in Idaho’s five northern counties Friday night to make sure sex offenders don’t try to attract children to their homes on Halloween. The North Idaho effort is part of the state Department of Correction’s Operation Lights Out, which started last year to help protect children and give parents peace of mind. Last year, the program netted a couple of arrests in the five counties, said Eric Kiehl, district manager for the Community Corrections Division in North Idaho.

Sex offenders on Halloween list

Probation and parole officers will work with local law enforcement in Idaho’s five northern counties Friday night to make sure sex offenders don’t try to attract children to their homes on Halloween. The North Idaho effort is part of the state Department of Correction’s Operation Lights Out, which started last year to help protect children and give parents peace of mind. Last year, the program netted a couple of arrests in the five counties, said Eric Kiehl, district manager for the Community Corrections Division in North Idaho.

Great pumpkins

Halloween, like most holidays, has seen its share of trends come and go. Trick-or-treaters have moved from front doorsteps to malls and churches. Popular costumes have switched from witches and ghosts to Hannah Montana and Harry Potter. And while pumpkins are still the squash of choice when it comes to décor, the one-toothed, three-triangled Jack-O’- Lanterns that used to adorn most porches seem to be disappearing. Today, people are finding creative ways to make their pumpkins stand out from the rest of the patch.

GREEN HALLOWEEN

Americans are expected to spend nearly $5.8 billion on Halloween this year. Almost $4 billion will go toward costumes, greeting cards and decorations, according to a recent survey from the National Retail Federation. That leaves about $1.8 billion that’s forecasted to be spent on candy alone. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Americans in 2006 consumed 26 pounds of candy per capita – much of it around Halloween.

Local characters offer inspiration … for costumes, that is

Gather 'round, ghouls. Tomorrow is Halloween and I'm betting there are still a lot of bank tellers, store clerks and office workers who haven't quite settled on what costume they will wear all day to annoy the rest of us. A Web site I perused reports that celebrity costumes are hot this year. One suggestion is to dress up like Amy Winehouse. (All you need is a giant black beehive hairdo, a dozen bad tattoos and enough dope to stone the population of Cleveland.)

Carving a Halloween niche

Curtis Wilkes has been carving pumpkins since he was a kid. Sure, so have lots of people.

Halloween rules target sex offenders

It's lights out on Halloween for 150 sex offenders in Kootenai County. Sex offenders on felony probation – about half of all registered sex offenders in Kootenai County – are being ordered to stay home on Halloween.

House Of Terror Up To Code, Can Open

The House of Terror is up to city code and will be able to open, fire officials said. The expected opening last Friday of the haunted house at Browne and Spokane Falls Boulevard was postponed because organizers hadn't completed the required special permit process and didn't meet city codes for functioning sprinkler and alarm systems.