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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Message resonates with region’s contingent

Members of Congress of both parties from Idaho and Washington gave President Barack Obama high marks for a speech that called for shared sacrifice and cooperation to lift the nation out of its economic problems. None was quite ready, though, to name something they’d be willing to give up in Obama’s call to “sacrifice some worthy priorities for which there are no dollars.”

Smart Bombs: A Tony for baloney

Now that the Oscars have been handed out, let’s turn our attention to the political theater surrounding the federal stimulus package. Several Republican governors are solid candidates for Tony Awards for acting like they didn’t want any part of what U.S. Sen. Jim Risch, R-Idaho, called a “giant fraud.” In Congress, only three Republican senators voted for the package; no GOP House members voted for it. Their opposition was based on the fear the bill would usher in an era of disastrous socialism. I think that’s overwrought, but I can respect a principled stand. So, naturally, states run by Republicans would reject the money to help protect America from ruin, right?

Northwest lawmakers react to Obama speech

Members of Congress from both parties in Idaho and Washington gave President Obama high marks for a speech that called for shared sacrifice and cooperation to lift the nation out of its economic problems.

Risch had wrong mouse, district in blasting stimulus project

BOISE – Idaho Sen. Jim Risch blasted the federal economic stimulus bill Wednesday for being filled with big earmarks for Democratic leaders, but his prime example turned out to be in error. “Remember, the president promised us change, and indeed we did get change,” Risch told the Idaho State Senate. “The earmarks used to be a million or 2 or 3 million dollars – in this particular bill, Nancy Pelosi’s earmark for the red-breasted harvest mouse, which you’ve probably never even seen because it only exists in her district, to save that is $50 million.”

Risch blasts stimulus ‘earmarks’

Idaho Sen. Jim Risch blasted the federal economic stimulus bill Wednesday for being filled with big earmarks for Democratic leaders, but his prime example turned out to be in error.

Loose moose not about to be bullied

Dunno what excuse you used the last time you missed work or called to say you’d be late. But Jana Tritto offered one that remains uncommon, although it might not be for long, if the local wildlife continues hanging out in the ’burbs. Jana was tardy not long ago because “there was a big bull moose camped out between the house and my truck, and there was no scaring him off.” So she waited the moose out, stating: “I’m not sure (my co-workers) believed me. It sounded like a ‘dog ate my homework’ excuse!” Fish and Gamers tell Jana that there are probably two moose per acre in her Hidden Valley area, between Hauser and Rathdrum. Actually, Jana is accustomed to seeing Br’er Bullwinkle and kin. She counted as many as four moose in a half mile on Church Road recently. Deer are more plentiful. Reports she at Huckleberries Online: “I have to be really careful driving in the evenings when they come out to feed. I’ve counted 50-plus on several summer evening walks, as they graze in the fields around here.” That’s a big part of the reason she loves the hills in the Hauser/Rathdrum area. “I never tire of seeing the wildlife,” she said. Unless, of course, it’s loitering in the wrong place and too big to shoo off. How long, O Goracle?

A tempered Risch joining U.S. Senate

BOISE – Jim Risch was a formidable political force in Idaho, feared and admired as he wielded his power – and then, suddenly, everything ended. It was 1988, and the Republican president pro-tem of the Idaho Senate found himself turned out of office by the voters. In what he called his last press conference, Risch declared himself done with politics. He would return to private life for good.

Risch’s Romney ad aims at LDS

BOISE – Idaho Senate candidate Jim Risch is airing two campaign commercials just before the election – but one’s not running in North Idaho. That ad, featuring former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who is Mormon, appears only in southern and eastern Idaho, which have large Mormon populations.

Candidates address military service

MERIDIAN, Idaho – Pressed by two of his opponents to explain why he never served in the military, GOP Senate candidate Jim Risch, Idaho’s current lieutenant governor, said Tuesday that an ulcer kept him from serving in the Vietnam War. “I had an ongoing ulcer, and they didn’t want me,” Risch told about 120 people at a Meridian Chamber of Commerce luncheon candidate forum. “I went into public service as a deputy prosecutor. Certainly that isn’t – I wouldn’t consider that as the same as a veteran, but nonetheless it was public service.”

New campaign ads for Risch, LaRocco

BOISE – The two leading candidates for Idaho’s open U.S. Senate seat are focusing on their differences on taxes and Social Security as the election approaches. Republican Jim Risch has a new TV commercial airing statewide and in the Spokane market that tries to paint Democratic rival Larry LaRocco as a tax-raiser. Three of the four claims in the ad are based on LaRocco’s vote for the Deficit Reduction Act of 1993, when he served in Congress.

Senate hopefuls rip absent Risch

BOISE – Four of the candidates for Idaho’s open U.S. Senate seat ripped into the absent fifth, GOP candidate Jim Risch, as they debated Thursday on live TV. “I would ask him … why he is spending so much time lying to the Idaho people,” Libertarian Kent Marmon declared, criticizing Risch’s campaign ads and public statements. “I would ask him why he thinks he has to do that in order to be elected to the U.S. Senate.”

Senate candidates lively

BOISE – The two major-party candidates for Larry Craig’s Senate seat split on the idea of a second economic stimulus package in a debate Tuesday night. “Pretty soon you’re going to start talking about real money here,” said Idaho Lt. Gov. Jim Risch, a Republican, who noted that such a package would follow a multibillion-dollar financial bailout and another multimillion-dollar stimulus package earlier this year. Risch said he’s “skeptical” of the idea.

Idaho Senate debate lively

BOISE – The two major-party candidates for Larry Craig’s Senate seat split on the idea of a second economic stimulus package in a debate Tuesday night. “Pretty soon you’re going to start talking about real money here,” said Idaho Lt. Gov. Jim Risch, a Republican, who noted that such a package would follow a multibillion-dollar financial bailout and another multimillion-dollar stimulus package earlier this year. Risch said he’s “skeptical” of the idea.