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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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North Central student earns a trip to Capitol for State of the Union speech

The Satake family of Spokane didn’t need to travel to the other Washington to appreciate the impact of national politics on their daily lives. They see it every day with 17-year-old Jake, a senior at North Central High School, who four years ago was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes.

3 years in, no sign of Trump’s replacement for Obamacare

As a candidate for the White House, Donald Trump repeatedly promised that he would “immediately” replace President Barack Obama’s health care law with a plan of his own that would provide “insurance for everybody.”

Obamacare sign-ups steady as debate persists over its future

More than 8 million people have signed up for coverage next year under former President Barack Obama’s health care law, the government said Friday, showing continued demand for the program amid ongoing uncertainty over its future.

Court: Part of ‘Obamacare’ invalid, more review needed

A federal appeals court on Wednesday struck down “Obamacare’s” now-toothless requirement that Americans carry health insurance but sidestepped a ruling on the law’s overall constitutionality. The decision means the law remains in effect for now.

Washington regulators target faith-based health care firm that Spokane Valley woman says scammed her

They’re protected from state regulation and are the health coverage of choice for about 25,000 Washington residents. But one Spokane Valley woman is among two dozen statewide who say they were duped by a “health care sharing ministry,” a corporation that operates outside of traditional insurance rules, to believe they were receiving guaranteed coverage that didn’t materialize. Regulators in Washington and Texas are working to stop the company’s sales within their borders.

Washington Legislature moves to address ‘surprise billing’ that affects 1 in 5 ER patients

Patients are showing up at emergency clinics with the expectation that their care will be covered by their health plan. But some of the ER doctors aren’t covered by the same contract that applies to the hospital. A Washington state law would seek to stop patients from being billed when that discrepancy happens, but there are some lingering questions from those in the health care industry the law would affect amid widespread agreement that patients shouldn’t be footed with a bill.

Froma Harrop: May you be healthy and covered in 2019

A federal judge in Texas just threw out the Affordable Care Act root and branch. Upheld, the ruling would rocket Republicans toward their goal of killing Obamacare. The downside for Republicans is that the program has become quite popular.

Trump pushes Congress for new health law after court ruling

After a federal judge ruled that the Obama-era health overhaul was “invalid,” President Donald Trump is looking to congressional leaders to come up with a replacement even as the White House says the current law will remain in place for now.

Where they stand: Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Lisa Brown on health care, Medicare and Medicaid

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers voted for a narrowly unsuccessful Republican plan to overhaul the nation’s health care system. She says it was in an effort to give states and patients more choice in their health care options. Lisa Brown, her Democratic opponent, says the bill was bad for the district and that a government option for health care is needed to help stabilize the system, while stopping short of a fully public system that dozens of the members of her party have supported.

Modest premium hikes as ‘Obamacare’ stabilizes

Millions of people covered under the Affordable Care Act will see only modest premium increases next year, and some will get price cuts. That’s the conclusion from an exclusive analysis of the besieged but resilient program, which still sparks deep divisions heading into this year’s midterm elections.