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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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AI can make up news stories from handful of words

OpenAI, an artificial intelligence research group co-founded by billionaire Elon Musk, has demonstrated a piece of software that can produce authentic-looking fake news articles after being given just a few pieces of information. In an example published recently by OpenAI, the system was given some sample text: “A train carriage containing controlled nuclear materials was stolen in Cincinnati today. Its whereabouts are unknown.” From this, the software was able to generate a convincing seven-paragraph news story, including quotes from government officials, with the only caveat being that it was entirely untrue.

Elderly, conservatives shared more Facebook fakery in 2016

People over 65 and ultra conservatives shared about seven times more fake information masquerading as news on the social media site than younger adults, moderates and super liberals during the 2016 election season, a new study finds.

Newseum pulls ‘fake news’ shirts after outcry from journalists

At the end of a week in which getting the White House to clarify whether it considers the news media “the enemy of the people” was a major story, Poynter made a revelation after visiting the Newseum’s website. The Washington, D.C., attraction “dedicated to the importance of a free press and the first amendment” was selling “You are very fake news” T-shirts.

Allan B. Steen: It’s time for the news media to fight back

Not many Americans have heard of the Society of Professional Journalists, though probably more than 95 percent of the men and women who make up America’s news media are members. However, I’d say less than 5 percent of America’s news consumers have ever heard of it. And we hear the term “news media” continuously, but without much thought, not realizing together it means the mediums of the newspaper, the magazine, radio and television. In the preamble to its Code of Ethics, the Society of Professional Journalism asks only of its members to remember that “public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. Ethical journalism strives to ensure the free exchange of information that is accurate, fair and thorough. An ethical journalist acts with integrity.”

Clarence Page: Trump calls media ‘corrupt’? Look who’s talking

In case you hadn’t figured it out by now, President Donald Trump has what most of us should have figured out: His campaign against “fake news” is really a war against any news that he does not like. “The Fake News is working overtime,” he tweeted Wednesday morning. “Just reported that, despite the tremendous success we are having with the economy & all things else, 91 percent of the Network News about me is negative (Fake). Why do we work so hard in working with the media when it is corrupt? Take away credentials?”

Trump suggests revoking reporters’ credentials

In his latest volley against the free press, President Donald Trump on Wednesday suggested that reporters have their credentials revoked for reporting negative news about him, calling such reporting “fake.”

Blind spot in the United States Constitution: fake news

In writing our national Constitution, the Founding Fathers created a marvelous document, which has stood the test of time in most areas critical to the health of our nation. However, that document was written in a time when news could travel only at the speed of a horse. The newspapers of those times were primitive, with limited distribution. There was no way that these far-sighted gentlemen could have envisioned news traveling at the speed of an electron, with dissemination reaching billions of people simultaneously. And that is the world that we are living in, for better or worse. The Federal Communications Commission, an independent agency, was founded in 1934 within the federal government following congressional passage of the Communications Act of 1934 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It has as its federally-defined purpose to “make available so far as possible, to all the people of the United States, without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex, rapid, efficient, nationwide, and world-wide wire and radio communication services with adequate facilities at reasonable charges.” Since its inception, the commission has been the subject of political controversy regarding its regulatory limits, pricing, content, communications media ownership and essentially every aspect of its mandate, and such controversy persists. As electronic media grew from radio, to television, to the internet, the mission of the FCC has grown exponentially more complex. The financial power of major media organizations has grown massively, impacting and restricting the regulatory powers of the organization, even while the growth of such power impacts our national dialogue.

Vatican bows to pressure, releases retired pope’s letter

Stung by accusations of spreading “fake news,” the Vatican on Saturday released the complete letter by Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI about Pope Francis after coming under blistering criticism for selectively citing it in a press release and digitally manipulating a photograph of it.

‘Fake news’ smear takes hold among politicians at all levels

An Idaho state lawmaker urges her constituents to submit entries for her "fake news awards." The Kentucky governor tweets #FAKENEWS to dismiss questions about his purchase of a home from a supporter. An aide to the Texas land commissioner uses the phrase to downplay the significance of his boss receiving donations from employees of a company...

‘Fake news’ smear takes hold among politicians at all levels

An Idaho state lawmaker urges her constituents to submit entries for her “fake news awards.” The Kentucky governor tweets #FAKENEWS to dismiss questions about his purchase of a home from a supporter. An aide to the Texas land commissioner uses the phrase to downplay the significance of his boss receiving donations from employees of a company that landed a multimillion-dollar contract.

Mimicking Trump, local officials use ‘fake news’ as a weapon

An Idaho lawmaker urges her constituents to submit entries for her “fake news awards.” The Kentucky governor tweets #FAKENEWS to dismiss questions about his purchase of a home from a supporter. An aide to the Texas land commissioner uses the phrase to downplay the significance of his boss receiving donations from employees of a company that landed a multimillion-dollar contract.