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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Democrats tackling flash points of taxes, health, climate

WASHINGTON – Revamp the tax code and important federal health care and environment programs. Spend $3.5 trillion over 10 years, but maybe a lot less. Ensure that no more than three Democrats in all of Congress vote “no” because Republicans will be unanimously opposed.

Sweeping new vaccine mandates for 100 million Americans

WASHINGTON — In his most forceful pandemic actions and words, President Joe Biden on Thursday ordered sweeping new federal vaccine requirements for as many as 100 million Americans — private-sector employees as well as health care workers and federal contractors — in an all-out effort to curb the surging COVID-19 delta variant.

Medicare evaluating coverage for $56,000 Alzheimer’s drug

WASHINGTON – Medicare on Monday launched a formal process to decide whether to cover Aduhelm, the new Alzheimer’s drug whose $56,000-a-year price tag and unproven benefits have prompted widespread criticism and a congressional investigation.

Dems eye $6T plan on infrastructure, Medicare, immigration

WASHINGTON — Democrats are eyeing a $6 trillion infrastructure investment plan that goes far beyond roads and bridges to include core party priorities, from lowering the Medicare eligibility age to 60 and adding dental, vision and hearing benefits to incorporating a long-running effort to provide legal status for certain immigrants, including “Dreamers."

To curb drug prices, Democrats still seeking a balance

WASHINGTON — Democrats are committed to passing legislation this year to curb prescription drug prices, but they're still disagreeing on how to cut costs for patients and taxpayers while preserving profits that lure investors to back potentially promising treatments.

Medicare copays for new Alzheimer’s drug could reach $11,500

 A new $56,000-a-year Alzheimer’s drug would raise Medicare premiums broadly, and some patients who are prescribed the medication could face copayments of about $11,500 annually, according to a research report published Wednesday.

FDA approves much-debated Alzheimer’s drug panned by experts

Government health officials on Monday approved the first new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn’t been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease.

Senate confirms Brooks-LaSure to run health care programs

The Senate on Tuesday confirmed President Joe Biden’s pick to run U.S. health insurance programs, putting in place a key player who’ll carry out his strategy for expanding affordable coverage and reining in prescription drug costs.

Medicare for 60-year-olds not guaranteed to be a better deal

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden and progressive Democrats have proposed to lower Medicare’s eligibility age to 60, to help older adults get affordable coverage. But a new study finds that Medicare can be more expensive than other options, particularly for many people of modest means.

Science panel urges every American have primary care physician

The U.S. must bolster primary care and connect more Americans with a dedicated source of care, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine warns in a report that sounds the alarm about an endangered foundation of U.S. health care.

Biden’s Medicare pick would be 1st Black woman to hold post

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden has picked a former Obama administration official to run the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The agency oversees government health insurance programs covering more than 1 out of 3 Americans and is a linchpin of the health care system.

Gig work is spreading – how to negotiate your deal

The coronavirus is accelerating a seismic shift in the employee-employer relationship. An April survey reported that nearly one-third of employers expect to replace full-time employees with contingent, or gig, workers. To save money, of course, because most gig workers don’t receive benefits such as health insurance and a retirement plan.