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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Area roundup: Sasquatch women stay in first place

Brooke Randall scored 26 points and Community Colleges of Spokane (16-2, 6-0 Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges) shot 6 of 8 from the free-throw line in overtime Wednesday to notch a 56-48 win at Walla Walla. WWCC (12-5, 3-3) overcame a 55-46 deficit to force OT. Korrie Bourn added 14 rebounds for CCS.

WSU women roll over California

Sage Romberg scored 13 points and went 3 of 4 from behind the 3-point arc to help Washington State hammer Pac-10 women’s basketball foe California 77-63 on Friday night in Pullman. Katie Madison and Rosetta Adzasu each added 11 points as the Cougars (4-13, 2-3) won back-to-back conference games.

Roundup: WSU women snap seven-game losing streak

 Sage Romberg came off the bench to score 21 points in 22 minutes Saturday as Washington State beat Oregon State 58-50 in Pacific-10 Conference women’s basketball action in Corvallis, Ore. Romberg hit 6 of 9 field-goal attempts, including 2 of 4 3-pointers, and was 7 for 8 from the free-throw line for the Cougars (3-13, 1-3 Pac-10), who snapped a seven-game losing streak. Ireti Amojo added 11 points for Washington State.

Stars align for opening of planetarium at SFCC

Studying the universe soon will become a little easier. A 53-seat planetarium is expected to open this spring in the newly constructed science building at Spokane Falls Community College, becoming one of five planetariums in Washington and the second in the region.

NIC wins despite CCS’ 19 3-pointers

North Idaho College men’s basketball coach Jared Phay had never seen a stat sheet like it. Neither had Community Colleges of Spokane counterpart Clint Hull. NIC was outscored 57-3 from behind the 3-point line but even that wasn’t enough to stop the Cardinals, who owned the paint and outlasted the Sasquatch 105-97 Thursday in a wildly entertaining contest played at Central Valley High School.

Blanchette: Wynne, 24, realizes his dreams at CC Spokane

Some days, Preston Wynne is up and on the road by 5:30 a.m. and may get home barely in time to tuck in his two children at bedtime. He is 24, back in a classroom after a six-year hiatus, still not completely sure where he’s going but convinced education will take him there. The definitive non-traditional student.

College class sizes grow, programs suffer as cuts deepen

Enrollment is up at community colleges throughout the nation, and the White House considers the two-year institutions a key to America’s economic recovery. But even as more students are seeking an education in the state’s most affordable postsecondary schools, budget cuts already ordered and even deeper cuts looming will mean fewer instructors, fewer classes and fewer students served.

Blanchette: CCS Hall of Famer has lived what he writes

God, how I hated the moment, my life, and the blind ambition that had carried me here. Then, drenched and shivering, with my knees bent and legs braced wide against the twisting deck, I stooped and threw up for ten uninterrupted minutes. – Spike Walker, Working on the Edge

Community Colleges chancellor brings rural perspective

Last week, President Barack Obama called community college teachers “the unsung heroes of American education,” training students for 21st century jobs.     Christine Johnson, the new chancellor of Community Colleges of Spokane, appreciated the national shout-out. Johnson, 57, and her husband, Carl Griffin, a retired IBM executive and avid outdoorsman, moved here this summer from the University of Colorado in Denver, where Johnson was special assistant to the provost.

WSU president rejects across-board cuts

SPOKANE – Facing millions of dollars in budget cuts, Washington State University President Elson S. Floyd said the school needs to make a stronger case about the importance of higher education. “Everything must and should be on the table as we attempt to balance the budget,” Floyd told students in Pullman on Wednesday. But he rejected across-the-board cuts, saying they lead to mediocrity.

DO-IT helps kids with disabilities develop to full potential

Seventeen-year-old Mead High School student Benjy Migliuri recently returned from a visit to the University of Washington. While it’s not unusual for high school seniors to tour prospective colleges, Migliuri’s 10-day stay was unique and one he’d never dreamed possible. “I’m a quadriplegic from birth,” he said. “I’ve been in a wheelchair all my life.”

DO-IT helps kids with disabilities develop to their full potential

Seventeen-year-old Mead High School student Benjy Migliuri recently returned from a visit to the University of Washington. While it’s not unusual for high school seniors to tour prospective colleges, Migliuri’s 10-day stay was unique and one he’d never dreamed possible. “I’m a quadriplegic from birth,” he said. “I’ve been in a wheelchair all my life.” His visit was made possible by the DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Scholars Summer Study program. Funded by the state of Washington, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Education, the program offers disabled students a glimpse of college life. DO-IT’s goal is to increase the success of individuals with disabilities in challenging academic programs and careers.

For-profit colleges can leave grads mired in a mess

NEW YORK – One sign a degree from a for-profit school may not be worth pursuing? You won’t be able to repay your student loans after graduating. New data from the Department of Education reveals low repayment rates among recent graduates of for-profit schools, which usually offer certificate programs or degrees in fields such as criminal justice or health care. The numbers were released as part of the Obama administration’s proposed rule to cut off federal aid to schools that don’t achieve certain repayment rates.

Retiring chancellor has advice for kids, community

Gary Livingston, 62, retires next month after eight years as chancellor of the Community Colleges of Spokane. He also was superintendent of Spokane Public Schools from 1993 to 2001. On many area boards, he’s one of the community’s most vocal advocates for education. He grew up in Kansas and taught special-education classes before moving into administration. Q.You grew up as the oldest of seven kids. How did that shape you?