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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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At last battle of Deep Creek re-enactment, Union and Confederacy return to Gettysburg

With the thunderous crack of a cannon and the sulfurous pop of a musket, the Battle of Gettysburg was on. The Union soldiers, clad in various shades of blue, moved slowly up the hill to the tune of artillery fire drowning out a lonely trio of musicians playing the songs of war. Beneath them and occupying a small meadow, Confederate infantry men and women fired in unison to their superior’s command, each snap bringing a flurry of gun powder dancing in the air.

Lincoln urges nation to give thanks

Today we offer the Thanksgiving proclamation issued by President Abraham Lincoln on Oct. 3, 1863. The year that is drawing towards its close has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God.

Debate over Ken Burns Civil War doc continues over decades

From the time it aired nearly 30 years ago, Ken Burns’ Civil War documentary has been a popular sensation and subject of debate. Earlier this week, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders cited the film in defense of Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, who had said the Civil War could have been avoided with more compromise.

White House backs Kelly on Confederate monuments

White House chief of staff John Kelly says Confederate General Robert E. Lee was “an honorable man” and applying current thinking on social issues to figures in history is “very, very dangerous.”

Analysis: Roy Moore’s victory and Bob Corker’s retirement are fresh indicators of a Senate that’s coming apart

Roy Moore’s victory in Alabama and Bob Corker’s retirement in Tennessee on Tuesday sent shockwaves across the Capitol and shivers down the spines of institutionalists in both parties. The dual developments are fueling concerns about the long-term health of the world’s greatest deliberative body and heightening fears that the center may not hold in American politics.

We’re still fighting, more than 150 years after Appomattox

After all this time, it could be argued that it doesn’t matter, but the blood that was shed over a statue of Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Virginia, is powerful evidence that it does. The national dispute over the fate of stone and bronze monuments begs this larger question: How does one country with two histories move forward?

Historians warn against rushing to take down statues

The national soul-searching over whether to take down monuments to the Confederacy’s demigods has extended to other historical figures accused of wrongdoing, including Christopher Columbus (brutality toward Native Americans), the man for whom Boston’s Faneuil Hall is named (slave trader) and former Philadelphia Mayor Frank Rizzo (bigotry).

Half of trapped Raqqa population are children, U.N. official says

Half of the estimated 20,000 people trapped in Syria’s northern city of Raqqa are children, an official with the U.N. children’s agency said Friday, describing the traumatizing experiences of children who recently fled the rule of Islamic State group militants as “absolutely staggering.”

Charlottesville votes to shroud statues

The Charlottesville City Council voted to drape two Confederate statues in black fabric during a chaotic meeting packed with irate residents who screamed and cursed at councilors over the city’s response to a white nationalist rally.