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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Expired parking meter would cost $25 under plan

Motorists could soon face heftier fines for parking too long at downtown parking meters. The Spokane City Council is scheduled tonight to consider raising parking ticket fines from $15 to $25.

Tab tax returns to council agenda

A Spokane City Council vote two weeks ago rejecting a $20 annual vehicle tax appears to be only a bump in the road for supporters of the new fee. Council President Joe Shogan vowed this week to reconsider the issue, and the council will decide Monday if it will hold a Feb. 14 hearing on the vehicle tab fee.

Bomb capable of lethal impact

Lindsey Reiswig and her co-workers got the first indication something wasn’t right Monday morning when a Spokane police officer came by Auntie’s Bookstore and said they needed to clear the building because of a suspicious backpack across the street. “We basically evacuated all the customers out of the back door. But we were working on inventory so some of us stayed and worked,” she said. “We didn’t think it was going to be anything serious.”

Council rejects car tab tax

Spokane’s car owners won’t have to pay an extra city tax to pay for street upgrades. After months of often-contentious debate, a divided Spokane City Council on Monday rejected a $20 annual fee on vehicle tabs.

Hmong celebration invigorates longtime traditions

Though many residents are counting the days until Christmas, one group has already celebrated the new year. On Dec. 4, the Spokane Hmong Association hosted a traditional new year party featuring colorful garb and plentiful food. Unlike the Western new year, the Hmong people have no set calendar date for the celebration. Vang Xiong, of the Spokane Hmong Association, said because their ancestors were farmers, the festivities were usually held after the crops had been harvested; the date varied from region to region.

Deputy fire chief cut stirs furor

The Spokane City Council’s decision last week to cut a deputy fire chief position has angered administrators and Mayor Mary Verner. “It was not discussed with me. It was not discussed with the chief. It was completely unexpected,” Verner said. “What has been created here is an impossibility for getting the job done.”

Hmong celebration invigorates longtime traditions

Though many residents are counting the days until Christmas, one group has already celebrated the new year. On Dec. 4, the Spokane Hmong Association hosted a traditional new year party featuring colorful garb and plentiful food. Unlike the Western new year, the Hmong people have no set calendar date for the celebration. Vang Xiong, of the Spokane Hmong Association, said because their ancestors were farmers, the festivities were usually held after the crops had been harvested; the date varied from region to region.

City vehicle tab tax in limbo

The Spokane City Council is balking on plans to impose a new $20 tax on vehicles this year, and in a surprise move shifted money away from road plowing and repairs to be spent instead rewarding departments whose labor unions made requested wage and benefit concessions. The council voted in October to give itself the authority to create the local tab tax, but it has since deferred a decision.

City Council delays vote on tab tax

Motorists in Spokane soon could have to pay an extra $20 a year to license their vehicles. But a final decision on whether to impose the local tab tax was delayed Monday by the Spokane City Council to wait and see if city’s largest employee union will agree to budget-balancing concessions being sought by city leaders.

Tense exchanges reveal city’s budget stress

Call it the e-mail thread heard round the city. As Spokane wrestled with its sad but necessary budget-cutting in recent weeks, a series of e-mail messages – forwarded to all city employees – has laid out some of the stark lines of tension in three easy pieces:

Jury convicts Elton of 2 misdemeanors

A jury today convicted a Spokane man of two counts of misdemeanor harassment against City Council President Joe Shogan and Betsy Cowles, chairwoman of the company that owns The Spokesman-Review.

Shogan, Cowles describe fear of threats

Spokane City Council president Joe Shogan claims he so feared the man on trial for harassing him that he changed his daily routine and still carries a copy of a restraining order in his wallet. “I’m always on the alert for somebody who looks like David Elton,” Shogan testified Tuesday in Spokane County Superior Court.