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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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A tally of every space launch by every nation

There was a moment in the 1983 movie about the early history of NASA, “The Right Stuff,” when an astronaut comments: “No bucks, no Buck Rogers.” Space travel is expensive.

NASA call for astronauts draws 12,000 spaceflight hopefuls

Who wants to be an astronaut? More than 12,000 people do, resulting in NASA’s second-largest group of astronaut hopefuls. NASA said Wednesday that Americans from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and four U.S. territories applied to be part of the space agency’s next astronaut class. The monthlong application period ended Tuesday.

Anne McClain offers her advice for applying to be an astronaut

About every four years, NASA accepts applications for a new class of astronauts. We in the astronaut office are thrilled and excited it is that time again! As someone who just went through this process a short seven years ago, I know how stressful it can be.

Moon mission could cost $50 billion, NASA says in report criticizing Boeing

The report, by the NASA inspector general, painted another grim picture of the troubles that have long plagued the Space Launch System rocket as Boeing, NASA’s prime contractor on the rocket, struggles to get the unwieldy program under control. It said that more schedule delays were likely and that the space agency might not be able to meet the goal of landing people on the moon by 2024 or orbiting Mars by the 2030s.

Pioneering black NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson dies

Katherine Johnson, a mathematician who calculated rocket trajectories and earth orbits for NASA’s early space missions and was later portrayed in the 2016 hit film “Hidden Figures,” about pioneering black female aerospace workers, has died. She was 101.

‘Black in Space’ looks at final frontier of civil rights

In 1959, Ronald Erwin McNair walked into a South Carolina library. The 9-year-old aspiring astronaut wanted to check out a calculus book, but a librarian threatened to call the police if he didn’t leave. McNair was black. Years later, McNair was selected to become only the second African American to travel to space, overcoming segregation, poverty and stereotypes in an intellectual act of resistance that inspired a generation.