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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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House Democrats propose stopgap spending bill

Democrats controlling the House are proposing a government-wide temporary funding bill to prevent a federal shutdown at month’s end and to give the slow-moving Senate time to act on $1.4 trillion worth of spending bills that fill in the details on this summer’s bipartisan budget and debt deal.

Washington talks could soon yield spending, debt deal

Washington negotiators are closing in on a budget and debt deal that would stave off the chance of a government shutdown this fall and allow Congress to speed through legislation to increase the government’s borrowing cap.

Pelosi: No debt increase until spending limits are raised

Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that the Democratic-controlled House won’t pass must-do legislation to increase the government’s borrowing cap until the Trump administration agrees to boost spending limits on domestic programs.

Woodward leads in campaign money; Stuckart criticizes ‘push’ poll

Contributions for former television news anchor Nadine Woodward have hit six figures, making her the only mayoral candidate in the crowded field to reach that mark so far. Meanwhile, an opponent, current City Council President Ben Stuckart, says a questionable campaign practice known as a push poll is contacting voters with misinformation. He initially alleged the poll came from the Woodward campaign, but later said it could have originated from an independent group.

Robert J. Samuelson: Defense spending is less than you think — here’s why

Whenever I or someone else suggests that we need higher defense spending, there is an incredulous response from critics: U.S. military spending equals the outlays of the next eight countries combined; how can we possibly be spending too little when we spend so much more than any conceivable adversary? The answer is that, while technically accurate, this argument is so distorted that it becomes a fiction. Global comparisons of military spending mislead for several reasons. One is secrecy. “What they report is not what they spend,” says Todd Harrison of the Center for Strategic & International Studies. A second reason is that, since World War II, the United States has assumed strategic responsibility for ensuring stability in Europe, Asia and the Middle East; neither China nor Russia has yet embraced similarly sweeping goals.